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Old 04-16-2012, 02:22 PM
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Default White Calls UFC-Mandated Random Testing 'Impossible,' but Status Quo Isn't Cutting It

Ben is dominating the main page of MMAFighting.com right now:

Quote:
Apr 15, 2012 - STOCKHOLM -- I donít blame UFC president Dana White for feeling a little sick and tired of hearing about drugs and drug testing. Coming off what was supposed to be a break from UFC action, he must feel like heís heard a lifetimeís worth of questions about what happens when grown men are made to pee into a cup.

Maybe thatís why he was in no mood to even entertain the idea of UFC-mandated random drug testing following the UFC on FUEL TV 2 press conference here on Sunday morning, blasting the idea as wholly unrealistic.

"I have 375 fighters in every country all over the world," White fumed. "The battle that I have to get these guys to get their [expletive] bout agreements back and show up for press is un[expletive]believable. The fact that I have to make personal phone calls to tell guys to talk to the [expletive] press. Now Iím going to start making personal phone calls to go show up for random drug tests? The general public and the media need to grasp some [expletive] concept of reality, okay? The reality of us doing all the [expletive] things that weíre doing, when we already have the gold standard in drug testing, and then trying to chase 375 guys all over the world to randomly test them too? Itís impossible."
Impossible? Not really. Difficult? Probably. Something the UFC shouldnít be responsible for? Arguably. But if the past few months have taught us anything, itís that something needs to change if we want to make a serious effort at cleaning up this sport, because excuses -- even valid ones -- arenít going to get it done.

As drug testing experts will tell you, the science of cheating often tends to be one step ahead of the science of catching cheaters. Steroids used to be way that MMA fighters got an unfair advantage. At least then the state athletic commissions stood a decent chance of nabbing them with fight week testing, since all it took was a slight miscalculation in the timing of steroid cycles. Now testosterone is the performance-enhancer of choice, in part because itís hard to detect unless you do the right tests at the right time, which are rare in MMA.

Thatís why itís tough to swallow when White claims that the UFC currently has "the gold standard in drug testing" for all of pro sports. As he pointed out this weekend, fighters are tested when they sign a Zuffa contract or show up to a fight. But because fighters know that, those are tests they can plan around. Especially with short-acting agents like testosterone, any test that isnít a surprise to the testee is practically a waste of time. At the moment, MMA has very little of that kind of testing, which is a problem that needs fixing.

There are exceptions, of course. The Nevada State Athletic Commission reminded us of the effectiveness of random testing when it popped Overeem for elevated testosterone levels in a surprise test just a couple weeks ago. Itís exactly that sort of testing that commissions should be doing more of, even if they also have very valid reasons for why they arenít.

As NSAC executive director Keith Kizer explained to me this past February, itís not just a financial issue.

"To me, itís not the funding so much as the lack of other resources. Weíre just one state. Weíre one state, in one country, so obviously weíre going to have less ability than a national or international agency," Kizer said. "...Tell me whoís going to be fighting on the [UFC] card here [in Las Vegas] on July 7. I donít think even Dana [White] and [UFC matchmaker] Joe [Silva] can tell me that right now."

Just like White, Kizer has a point. Not all states have equal access to funds or necessary information, and they donít feel they have the kind of ongoing jurisdiction over every fighter in MMA to effectively pull off random, out-of-competition drug testing. That makes some sense.

But then, what are we supposed to do? Just give up? Throw our hands in the air and say that the testing is as good as itís ever going to get?

I guess thatís one option, but then what do we tell guys like UFC middleweight Brian Stann, who just this week told me he was glad to see the MMA media spotlighting the issue of performance-enhancing drugs in MMA.

"Itís frustrating for guys like me who are trying to do it completely clean when you know that there are guys out there cheating and finding a way to get away with it," Stann said. "To have your hopes and dreams stolen by someone who cheated, itís not cool. And so what, even if they get caught afterwards, if you got knocked out by them? Every knockout in this sport knocks down your career another level, as far as how much more you can take. Fighters have mileage on us."

If that doesnít make you think twice about the importance of effective drug testing, it should. To the fighter whoís putting his brain and his dreams on the line when he steps into the cage, the argument that drug testing is just too difficult or too time-consuming doesnít mean much. If we want guys like Stann to stay clean, donít we owe it to them to crack down on the guys who arenít? How do we look him in the eye and tell him that more could be done to keep him from getting hit in the head by an unfairly enhanced opponent, but man, it would really be inconvenient for us?

To the UFCís credit, it does more on this issue than any other promoter. Itís also the sportís leader and standard-bearer, so thatís to be expected. White was right when he pointed out that thereís a reason no other promoter has been able to successfully do what he does.

"You know why?" he said. "Because this job is insane. Itís [expletive] crazy. I was standing in Las Vegas ten hours a guy filming a [expletive] TV show, and now Iím sitting here. And Iím going to randomly drug test 375 guys around the world. You know where Iím going in a few hours? To Abu Dhabi. Then I go back and film ĎThe Ultimate Fighter,í then I go to Atlanta, Miami, and Iím in Rio de Janeiro for three hours, then back to Las Vegas where Iíll film ĎThe Ultimate Fighterí again. And in between there somewhere Iím going to randomly drug test 375 [fighters]."

The answer is no, heís not, and I donít think anyone is suggesting that he personally take that on himself, just like he doesnít personally ensure that the Octagon is properly assembled for each event. White doesnít have to convince any of us that heís got a full schedule. Weíve all seen it in action. If I tried to run at the pace he does, Iíd have died of a heart attack or complications from jet lag a long time ago. Then again, the old ĎHey, Iím busyí defense doesnít fly with an issue as important as this one.

For the record, I donít think the UFC should be the one to administer random drug tests. For the same reasons that Marc Ratner is right to want to get out of the self-regulation racket, the UFC shouldnít be responsible for being its own PED watchdog. Thatís not fair to the fighters or to the UFC.

But itís clear that the athletic commission testing -- which ranges from pretty good in some states to might as well not even bother in many others -- isnít enough. The UFC must realize that on some level. Otherwise, why would it do any of its own testing? Why wouldnít it leave it entirely up to the commissions?

The UFC has done a lot to address this issue -- more than it is legally required to, in fact. That doesnít mean there isnít still a lot of room for necessary improvement. I think we all understand that itís difficult (though not impossible). We all understand that there are several good reasons why it isnít happening right now. But who said it was supposed to be easy? Either this matters to us or it doesnít. And if it matters, then we should find a way to do it, even when itís hard.
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Old 04-16-2012, 02:54 PM
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Random testing is not impossible.

You wanna work for the UFC? You agree to get randomly drug tested.

They do this at a lot of workplaces in America, for jobs as simple as pushing a few buttons.
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Old 04-16-2012, 03:52 PM
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Dana can hire me to call each fighter and tell them to take a drug test.

His 'gold standard' is a joke. Maybe he needs to strike some fear into these guys and have worse repercussions if you fail.
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Old 04-16-2012, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by J.B. View Post
Random testing is not impossible.

You wanna work for the UFC? You agree to get randomly drug tested.

They do this at a lot of workplaces in America, for jobs as simple as pushing a few buttons.
+1
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Old 04-16-2012, 05:45 PM
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Random drug testing is a requirement of my job.

You know how many times I've been randomly tested in over 20 years?

ZERO

In fact, I haven't heard of a single person I work with being tested. They SAY random drug testing is something we have to expect and agree to, hopefully to keep us honest, but they just don't do it.

If the US Government won't do it, what makes anyone think the state athletic commissions are going to do it?
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Old 04-16-2012, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by County Mike View Post
Random drug testing is a requirement of my job.

You know how many times I've been randomly tested in over 20 years?

ZERO

In fact, I haven't heard of a single person I work with being tested. They SAY random drug testing is something we have to expect and agree to, hopefully to keep us honest, but they just don't do it.

If the US Government won't do it, what makes anyone think the state athletic commissions are going to do it?
i was drug tested several times while in the military? A couple times while in schools and at least once in the fleet, it's quite common actually or at least was in the mid 90's while i was in.
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Old 04-16-2012, 09:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by County Mike View Post
Random drug testing is a requirement of my job.

You know how many times I've been randomly tested in over 20 years?

ZERO

In fact, I haven't heard of a single person I work with being tested. They SAY random drug testing is something we have to expect and agree to, hopefully to keep us honest, but they just don't do it.

If the US Government won't do it, what makes anyone think the state athletic commissions are going to do it?
The fact that your employer fails to do what it claims it needs it has to do has no bearing on this. A lot of child rapists walk free everyday, should we throw the whole legal system in the trash?
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Old 04-16-2012, 09:43 PM
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I've been randomly tested 8 times in 12 years for my job.

I think Dana is a little over dramatic here with his "i can't do it all" crapola speech. Great article.
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Old 04-16-2012, 10:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dana White
"The battle that I have to get these guys to get their [expletive] bout agreements back and show up for press is un[expletive]believable. The fact that I have to make personal phone calls to tell guys to talk to the [expletive] press. Now I’m going to start making personal phone calls to go show up for random drug tests? The general public and the media need to grasp some [expletive] concept of reality, okay? The reality of us doing all the [expletive] things that we’re doing, when we already have the gold standard in drug testing, and then trying to chase 375 guys all over the world to randomly test them too? It’s impossible."
Sounds like a hard life... making all those phone calls and coordinating all that crap.

If you don't care what guys are on, just say it. You certainly have something to say about the 12 year old kid who "illegally" downloads your show. Why pander now? Ohh, that's right...exposing the guys inside the sport who cheat could actually effect your wallet...

This isn't a sport. It's the Dana White show.

Last edited by J.B.; 04-16-2012 at 10:19 PM.
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Old 04-16-2012, 10:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J.B. View Post
The fact that your employer fails to do what it claims it needs it has to do has no bearing on this. A lot of child rapists walk free everyday, should we throw the whole legal system in the trash?
Your comparison to random drug testing and child rapists going free might be the dumbest one I've ever heard. Hugely different circumstances.
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