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Old 02-17-2009, 03:11 PM
Preach
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Default Any vets????

hereditary immune deficiency of dogs is this common? Is it able to be treated? Is it life threatening?
The reason I ask is a guy that bought a pup from me about 6 months ago called last night. He says that his pup had this and that the vet recommended putting it to sleep so they did. My question is if this is Hereditary then way is it both parents are healthy? And why is it none of the other 8 pups have had problems yet? Is this something to watch out for on my pup or parents?
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Old 02-17-2009, 03:59 PM
rearnakedchoke
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what kind of dogs are they?
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Old 02-17-2009, 04:42 PM
Preach
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Boxers
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Old 02-17-2009, 05:39 PM
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Llamafighter Llamafighter is offline
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Never heard of this I'll ssee what I can research!
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Old 02-17-2009, 10:08 PM
Bonnie Bonnie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Preach
Boxers
Ben, I just "googled" this and it did bring up sites mentioning boxers and immune deficiency.

On one site they talk about "nutrient deficiency" being an eminent cause of immune system deficiency in dogs. "Animal researchers have recently demonstrated that nutrient deficiency in one generation can affect immune system function in later generations, even if they are not nutrient deficient."

Then it goes on to talk about "boosting your dogs immune system"...

My mom has had two boxers: "Beaux" was a wonderful dog and lived well past the normal age (7-9 yrs, I believe); he lived to be 14. "Elvis" on the other hand was different, kinda wild--we think because of "over breeding". Elvis also lived a long life about 13; he developed tumors that were pushing against his lungs. We put him down.

Maybe with this pup, something happened in the line/generation before him that just presented itself in him/her. They listed a whole bunch of "hereditary" things that can go wrong in the boxer breed much like a human. My vet told me when my pure bred cat got sick that "pure breds" tend to get/have a lot of problems vs. mutts. I guess mutts are more "hardy".

As for being "treatable", I think, from what I read, it depends on what "particular" problem is presenting because of the "immune deficiency".
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Old 02-18-2009, 12:20 AM
mikthehick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Preach
hereditary immune deficiency of dogs is this common? Is it able to be treated? Is it life threatening?
The reason I ask is a guy that bought a pup from me about 6 months ago called last night. He says that his pup had this and that the vet recommended putting it to sleep so they did. My question is if this is Hereditary then way is it both parents are healthy? And why is it none of the other 8 pups have had problems yet? Is this something to watch out for on my pup or parents?
Hey Ben,

I'm really sry about the loss of the puppy. I'm partial to the boxers for real.

The autoimmune disease you mentioned is usually not life-threatening, but it will cause a lifetime of health problems like alopecia with no symptoms of fleas, hypothyroidism, and other diseases. From my work at the shelter, we learned that they still don't know what causes the disease, but it somehow tells the parts of the body that fight diseases to not fight disease and bad stuff.

Causes could be a recessive gene (and if both of your doggies who bred have that gene, some pups may have it as a dominant gene), or possibly overvaccinating. If you had the pups properly vaccinated, they should have been fine. But if the new owners take the dog to the vet, they are usually talked into more vaccines. And in that case, it would be the vets fault and not yours.

Puppies should not get bordatella until 6 months, rabies around 4 months, and distemper/parvo (DALPP) around 6 weeks, 9 weeks, and 12 weeks, then once a year after that.

Maybe get a different breeding pair next time. But if they owners overvaccinated the pup, then it's defo not any fault of yours. It's unfortunate, but this stuff happens all the time, especially at the spca where i worked.
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