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  #31  
Old 09-22-2009, 10:40 PM
Shane Lee 2
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Originally Posted by que View Post
let's not mince words here, we are not talking about if christianity is right or wrong. we are talking about america being a christian nation or not. two completely different subjects. and we are talking about people boo'ing/or not boo'ing vitor belforts comments

Oh we had drifted away from the booing a while ago but.........

I think the basic principles of a christian God is what our country was built on based on evidence from our founding fathers however I do agree they wanted to allow for religious tolerance since that is why they came in the first place. But I also believe they gave everyone the right to free speech and expression.

And I also believe Jesus empowered us to speak out against false Gods.

That's all.

Thanks que
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  #32  
Old 09-22-2009, 10:45 PM
TDPARKASH
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"Elephant standing on the back of a turtle"- where do you get this stuff from?
Hinduism only believes that there is one god, much like Islam. What you refer to are devotees or demigods that you have probably seen in the mahabharat or ramayan (not sure). A major part of Hinduism is the origins of the term "Karma"- which many have understood as what comes around, goes around. It is a lot more deeper then that as it about the embodiement of doing hard wark, and your respective duty.

I know you believe that my soul is dammed, but i have the opposite feeling. See I am an economist, and normally I could gave you a break down of facts, evidence to prove my point. Religion is one of those things that escapes that, this is why i say to each their own (as long as it makes you a better person). I have been in MMA for a while, so i am sure we would get along on that front, but i think that our views are entirely different.

I have read papers on how religion can cause differences among people, here is an example how.

? There are several d

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Originally Posted by Shane Lee 2 View Post
Since you are a Hindu can you explain to me the belief that the Earth is on the back of an Elephant standing on the back of a Turtle?

Also none of us dislike you and I believe you can worship Goldfish if you want but I am going to laugh at it. Sorry if you feel thats wrong. If we were friends I would pick at you about it and you could do the same to me if you want. But when it all boiled down to it I would be sad for your soul because if your name is not written in the Lamb's book of life and Jesus denies he knows you in front of his Father your soul will spend eternity in Hell. And I don't want that for anyone, honestly.
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  #33  
Old 09-22-2009, 10:48 PM
Chuck
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Originally Posted by Shane Lee 2 View Post
Thank you Mac, Chuck, and Nate! It's always funny to me how people will start name calling to try and hurt you or discredit what you say. I have sparred full out some of the best MMA guy's around a little name ain't gonna hurt. LOL
Hey don't thank me butthead! I'm all about the name calling ya schmuck... it's just that I've met you and your definitely not ignorant. Ugly, sure. Stink a little? Heck yeah....

you're just not ignorant ya jackass!






So we still gonna hook up when I come to Texas?
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  #34  
Old 09-22-2009, 11:02 PM
Shane Lee 2
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Originally Posted by TDPARKASH View Post
"Elephant standing on the back of a turtle"- where do you get this stuff from?
Hinduism only believes that there is one god, much like Islam. What you refer to are devotees or demigods that you have probably seen in the mahabharat or ramayan (not sure). A major part of Hinduism is the origins of the term "Karma"- which many have understood as what comes around, goes around. It is a lot more deeper then that as it about the embodiement of doing hard wark, and your respective duty.

I know you believe that my soul is dammed, but i have the opposite feeling. See I am an economist, and normally I could gave you a break down of facts, evidence to prove my point. Religion is one of those things that escapes that, this is why i say to each their own (as long as it makes you a better person). I have been in MMA for a while, so i am sure we would get along on that front, but i think that our views are entirely different.

I have read papers on how religion can cause differences among people, here is an example how.

? There are several d

Here is a little Hinduism and Buhdism belief info. one of which tells me about elephant gods and elephants holding things up......

I am glad your an economist not going so well for ya now is it... LOL.
I am employed as an Engineer (Technical chemical sales), have a charity, own an MMA gym, and manage fighters.



Elephants



ELEPHANTS. Indigenous to both Africa and India, the elephant is the largest of all living land animals. A peaceful herbivore, the adult of the species has no fear of any other animal, with the exceptions of the human hunter and small rodents that might crawl up its trunk. Because of its awesome strength and great size, the elephant—whether wild or tamed as a beast of burden—is commonly a symbol of power: both the brute force that supports the cosmos and its life forms and the majesty of royal power. At the same time, the wild elephant demonstrates numerous characteristics shared by human beings—such as longevity, social customs, and varied personality traits—which give rise to tales in which the elephant may be a companion to humans or may exhibit humanlike qualities such as fearfulness, rage, and stubbornness.

In India, the elephant-headed god Gaṇeśa has been widely revered as a remover of obstacles, hence as a bringer of success, among both Hindus and Buddhists. His enormous popularity is also attested outside India. As Indian culture spread, the cult of Gaṇeśa was enthusiastically accepted in Southwest Asia, and in China and Japan, Gaṇeśa became well known through the introduction of Tantric Buddhism to these lands.

Since ancient times, especially in India and North Africa, the elephant has been domesticated and trained as a beast of burden. The Carthaginians, for example, rode on elephants in their war against the Romans. In Hinduism, elephants hold up the four quarters of the universe: the earth rests on the back of elephants, which rest, in turn, on the back of a huge tortoise. According to the Mahābhārata, the divine elephant Airāvata was born out of the primeval milky ocean as it was being churned by the gods and demons. This elephant was destined to be the mount of Indra, the god of thunder and battle, protector of the cosmos.
The intimate connection in Hindu mythology between Airāvata and Indra indicates that the elephant is not simply a symbol for brute force but is also most broadly associated with the powers that support and protect life. Probably because of its round shape and gray color, the elephant is regarded as a "rain cloud" that walks the earth, endowed with the magico-religious ability to produce rain clouds at will. In present-day India, the elephant plays a significant part in an annual ceremony celebrated in New Delhi for the purposes of inducing rainfall, good harvest, and the fertility of human beings and their livestock. An elephant, painted white with sandal paste, is led in solemn procession through the city. The men attending the elephant wear women's clothes and utter obscene words, as if to stimulate the dormant powers of fertility.

Although in the period of the Ṛgveda elephants were tamed but little used in war, by the middle of the first millennium BCE, the owning of elephants had become a prerogative of kings and chieftains, who used them in warfare and on ceremonial occasions. Elephants, particularly albino ones, became the mounts of kings and, hence, symbolic of royal power. In the mythology of kingship, the white elephant appears as one of the seven treasures of the universal monarch (cakravartin), who rides upon it as he sets out on his world-inspection tours.

As the embodiment of perfect wisdom and royal dignity, the Buddha himself is often referred to as an elephant. According to the older, verse version of the Lalitavistara, the Buddha was conceived when his mother, Maya, dreamed of his descent from heaven in the form of a white elephant. This motif is depicted in a medallion on a balustrade of the Bharhut Stupa dating from the second or first century BCE, and from that time onward, it appears repeatedly in Buddhist iconography throughout India. The later, prose version of the Lalitavistara, followed by the Mahāvastu, states more emphatically that the Buddha descended into his mother's womb in elephantine form. In subsequent centuries, the Buddhist community has generally accepted the idea that a Buddha, either of the past or of the future, must enter his mother's womb in the form of an elephant.
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  #35  
Old 09-22-2009, 11:04 PM
Shane Lee 2
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Originally Posted by Chuck View Post
Hey don't thank me butthead! I'm all about the name calling ya schmuck... it's just that I've met you and your definitely not ignorant. Ugly, sure. Stink a little? Heck yeah....

you're just not ignorant ya jackass!






So we still gonna hook up when I come to Texas?
Now that I resemble that remark.....

Heck yeah and we'll go heckle some muslims.... Just Joking everyone don't freak out!
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  #36  
Old 09-22-2009, 11:14 PM
TDPARKASH
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What your referring to is a story regarding the Mahabharata, not Hinduism itself. Anyhow, i feel like this forum is a "christian friendly" forum so will not be making any future posts. I feel like I was talking to Tim Sylvia's fan club all day.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Shane Lee 2 View Post
Here is a little Hinduism and Buhdism belief info. one of which tells me about elephant gods and elephants holding things up......

I am glad your an economist not going so well for ya now is it... LOL.
I am employed as an Engineer (Technical chemical sales), have a charity, own an MMA gym, and manage fighters.



Elephants



ELEPHANTS. Indigenous to both Africa and India, the elephant is the largest of all living land animals. A peaceful herbivore, the adult of the species has no fear of any other animal, with the exceptions of the human hunter and small rodents that might crawl up its trunk. Because of its awesome strength and great size, the elephant—whether wild or tamed as a beast of burden—is commonly a symbol of power: both the brute force that supports the cosmos and its life forms and the majesty of royal power. At the same time, the wild elephant demonstrates numerous characteristics shared by human beings—such as longevity, social customs, and varied personality traits—which give rise to tales in which the elephant may be a companion to humans or may exhibit humanlike qualities such as fearfulness, rage, and stubbornness.

In India, the elephant-headed god Gaṇeśa has been widely revered as a remover of obstacles, hence as a bringer of success, among both Hindus and Buddhists. His enormous popularity is also attested outside India. As Indian culture spread, the cult of Gaṇeśa was enthusiastically accepted in Southwest Asia, and in China and Japan, Gaṇeśa became well known through the introduction of Tantric Buddhism to these lands.

Since ancient times, especially in India and North Africa, the elephant has been domesticated and trained as a beast of burden. The Carthaginians, for example, rode on elephants in their war against the Romans. In Hinduism, elephants hold up the four quarters of the universe: the earth rests on the back of elephants, which rest, in turn, on the back of a huge tortoise. According to the Mahābhārata, the divine elephant Airāvata was born out of the primeval milky ocean as it was being churned by the gods and demons. This elephant was destined to be the mount of Indra, the god of thunder and battle, protector of the cosmos.
The intimate connection in Hindu mythology between Airāvata and Indra indicates that the elephant is not simply a symbol for brute force but is also most broadly associated with the powers that support and protect life. Probably because of its round shape and gray color, the elephant is regarded as a "rain cloud" that walks the earth, endowed with the magico-religious ability to produce rain clouds at will. In present-day India, the elephant plays a significant part in an annual ceremony celebrated in New Delhi for the purposes of inducing rainfall, good harvest, and the fertility of human beings and their livestock. An elephant, painted white with sandal paste, is led in solemn procession through the city. The men attending the elephant wear women's clothes and utter obscene words, as if to stimulate the dormant powers of fertility.

Although in the period of the Ṛgveda elephants were tamed but little used in war, by the middle of the first millennium BCE, the owning of elephants had become a prerogative of kings and chieftains, who used them in warfare and on ceremonial occasions. Elephants, particularly albino ones, became the mounts of kings and, hence, symbolic of royal power. In the mythology of kingship, the white elephant appears as one of the seven treasures of the universal monarch (cakravartin), who rides upon it as he sets out on his world-inspection tours.

As the embodiment of perfect wisdom and royal dignity, the Buddha himself is often referred to as an elephant. According to the older, verse version of the Lalitavistara, the Buddha was conceived when his mother, Maya, dreamed of his descent from heaven in the form of a white elephant. This motif is depicted in a medallion on a balustrade of the Bharhut Stupa dating from the second or first century BCE, and from that time onward, it appears repeatedly in Buddhist iconography throughout India. The later, prose version of the Lalitavistara, followed by the Mahāvastu, states more emphatically that the Buddha descended into his mother's womb in elephantine form. In subsequent centuries, the Buddhist community has generally accepted the idea that a Buddha, either of the past or of the future, must enter his mother's womb in the form of an elephant.
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  #37  
Old 09-22-2009, 11:23 PM
Shane Lee 2
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Originally Posted by TDPARKASH View Post
What your referring to is a story regarding the Mahabharata, not Hinduism itself. Anyhow, i feel like this forum is a "christian friendly" forum so will not be making any future posts. I feel like I was talking to Tim Sylvia's fan club all day.
Well I am sure that negativity won't earn you any Karma points. I'm just joking. I hate you feel that way I didn't realize a friendly debate would be so painful for you but honestly please leave me your address or PM it to me cause I would honestly like to send you a bible as a gift.
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  #38  
Old 09-22-2009, 11:59 PM
Chuck
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Originally Posted by TDPARKASH View Post
What your referring to is a story regarding the Mahabharata, not Hinduism itself. Anyhow, i feel like this forum is a "christian friendly" forum so will not be making any future posts. I feel like I was talking to Tim Sylvia's fan club all day.
When did Tim Sylvia get fans????? Let alone a fan club???


You're probably right though... it's best to just leave rather then educate any of us on your faith. It's probably best that way... I mean no sense in teaching us anything about your faith... it's probably better if we're confused........
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  #39  
Old 09-23-2009, 12:04 AM
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TexasRN TexasRN is offline
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Originally Posted by TDPARKASH View Post
What your referring to is a story regarding the Mahabharata, not Hinduism itself. Anyhow, i feel like this forum is a "christian friendly" forum so will not be making any future posts. I feel like I was talking to Tim Sylvia's fan club all day.
Matt is a Christian. One of the main reasons for the site I believe, is for him to share his testimony with others. If this makes you uncomfortable then maybe it isn't the place for you but feel free to stick around and learn about us while sharing more of who you are.

And let's get one thing straight....Tim Sylvia's fans are not anywhere near as cool as we are. (nothing against Tim but we seriously rock)


~Amy
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