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  #11  
Old 07-28-2009, 10:35 PM
atomdanger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by County Mike
I was wondering when this topic would come up.

Police respond to a burglary call and find this guy inside the house.
He refuses to provide identification - calling the cop a racist instead.
Once he finally does prove that he's the homeowner, the cops start to leave.
He follows them, berating them the whole time about being racist.
Finally, the cop warns him that he's being disorderly and if he doesn't stop, he'll be arrested.
He doesn't stop. He's arrested.
Obama makes a comment about the cop acting stupidly for arresting the homeowner.
Cop refuses to apologize. He was doing his job.
Turns out, the cop is also the instructor for racial sensitivity training and has been for about 9 years.

He did no wrong. He simply questioned a suspect and then arrested a disorderly person. If the professor had just shown ID when first questioned it would have been a non-issue.

If your description is accurate I don't see a single problem.
Other than Obama commenting.
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  #12  
Old 07-28-2009, 11:45 PM
Bonnie Bonnie is offline
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Originally Posted by KENTUCKYREDBONE
That's pretty much my understanding of the matter! Sounds to me like the big shot professor was looking for trouble!
I wonder how he would have acted if it had been a black police officer handling the situation in the same manner the white cop did. And, most puzzling, the neighbor, why didn't he/she recognize Prof. Gates?

It was the neighbor that "racially profiled" Gates. I think Gates should hold a ten-million man march on his neighbor's lawn. That'll teach him to call 911 again...
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  #13  
Old 07-29-2009, 12:32 AM
County Mike
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Originally Posted by Bonnie
I wonder how he would have acted if it had been a black police officer handling the situation in the same manner the white cop did. And, most puzzling, the neighbor, why didn't he/she recognize Prof. Gates?

It was the neighbor that "racially profiled" Gates. I think Gates should hold a ten-million man march on his neighbor's lawn. That'll teach him to call 911 again...
Gates either locked himself out or was just having trouble getting his door open. The neighbor called police because Gates was trying to force his way in, banging his shoulder against the door. Apparently, the neighbor didn't recognize him. Just saw a man trying to break in.
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  #14  
Old 07-29-2009, 12:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie
I wonder how he would have acted if it had been a black police officer handling the situation in the same manner the white cop did. And, most puzzling, the neighbor, why didn't he/she recognize Prof. Gates?

It was the neighbor that "racially profiled" Gates. I think Gates should hold a ten-million man march on his neighbor's lawn. That'll teach him to call 911 again...
I saw a segment on cable news with an interview with the lawyer of the woman that called the police (yes, she has been so intimidated by the experience that she hired a lawyer to speak for her). The woman that called the police never mentioned the race of the two men entering the home. The dispatcher asked the caller about race and she replied that she thought that one was Hispanic and couldn't tell the race of the other man (Gates) because her view was obstructed. (As a point of clarification, the neighbor that first spotted the "break-in" was elderly and didn't have a cell phone; she asked a passer-by to call on her cellphone). A Hispanic and a Black police officer arrived part-way into the incident and they are supporting the White officer's story. The available police transcripts support the officer, as well. I think the thing that precipitated the arrest was when Gates responded to the officer's request to speak outside on the porch with the reply: "Ya', I'll speak to your Mama outside." All the Professor had to do was pull out his wallet and hand over his driver's license with his address on it. Gates escalated the whole incident. A policeman shouldn't have to put up with insults to his mother.
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  #15  
Old 07-29-2009, 12:37 AM
Bonnie Bonnie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by County Mike
Gates either locked himself out or was just having trouble getting his door open. The neighbor called police because Gates was trying to force his way in, banging his shoulder against the door. Apparently, the neighbor didn't recognize him. Just saw a man trying to break in.
Got it, thanks! I was being sarcastic about the other stuff. I think the lady was trying to do a good thing for neighbor Gates.
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  #16  
Old 07-29-2009, 12:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Play The Man
I saw a segment on cable news with an interview with the lawyer of the woman that called the police (yes, she has been so intimidated by the experience that she hired a lawyer to speak for her). The woman that called the police never mentioned the race of the two men entering the home. The dispatcher asked the caller about race and she replied that she thought that one was Hispanic and couldn't tell the race of the other man (Gates) because her view was obstructed. (As a point of clarification, the neighbor that first spotted the "break-in" was elderly and didn't have a cell phone; she asked a passer-by to call on her cellphone). A Hispanic and a Black police officer arrived part-way into the incident and they are supporting the White officer's story. The available police transcripts support the officer, as well. I think the thing that precipitated the arrest was when Gates responded to the officer's request to speak outside on the porch with the reply: "Ya', I'll speak to your Mama outside." All the Professor had to do was pull out his wallet and hand over his driver's license with his address on it. Gates escalated the whole incident. A policeman shouldn't have to put up with insults to his mother.
Yeah, I've had the same thing where I called in to report something and the operator/dispatcher asked me the race of the person. They need a description to tell the cops responding who/what to look for.
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  #17  
Old 07-29-2009, 02:11 AM
mscomc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Play The Man
I saw a segment on cable news with an interview with the lawyer of the woman that called the police (yes, she has been so intimidated by the experience that she hired a lawyer to speak for her). The woman that called the police never mentioned the race of the two men entering the home. The dispatcher asked the caller about race and she replied that she thought that one was Hispanic and couldn't tell the race of the other man (Gates) because her view was obstructed. (As a point of clarification, the neighbor that first spotted the "break-in" was elderly and didn't have a cell phone; she asked a passer-by to call on her cellphone). A Hispanic and a Black police officer arrived part-way into the incident and they are supporting the White officer's story. The available police transcripts support the officer, as well. I think the thing that precipitated the arrest was when Gates responded to the officer's request to speak outside on the porch with the reply: "Ya', I'll speak to your Mama outside." All the Professor had to do was pull out his wallet and hand over his driver's license with his address on it. Gates escalated the whole incident. A policeman shouldn't have to put up with insults to his mother.
If her view was obstructed as she says, how could she give accurate information as to someone trying to "force" or break their way into someones house? Anyway, thats not really the point I wanted to make:

Sure in hindsight, maybe the Gates acted a little foolishly and a little hot-headed, but I have yet to hear the full transcript from the police of the entire incident from gates and the officer. On ABC nightly news the other night, all i heard was a segment with the cop saying "the individual claims he lives here, but hes being un-cooperative, keep the cars coming"...or something to that effect.

I mean, not to make this a matter of race, because it shoudnt be....but who knows what gates' experiences have been with police in the past? I mean he probably lived through the civil rights movement where cops where known to be less than "fair" to african-americans........but putting all that side for a moment.....what if during their conversation, that COP really was being a jerk? I think we have all met those kind of cops....ones who just like to try and flex their muscle and act like the big bad boss....this site had like 30 page thread when that grandma got tased by some cop, and people thought he was probably acting all high and mighty.

So, not trying to pick sides, but maybe its not as cut and dry as it looks.
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  #18  
Old 07-29-2009, 02:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mscomc
If her view was obstructed as she says, how could she give accurate information as to someone trying to "force" or break their way into someones house?
The woman making the phone call and the woman that initially saw the "break-in" are two different people. The caller was told by an elderly neighbor of Gate's that she witnessed a "break-in". The caller was asked by the dispatcher in "real time" about the race of the suspects. At the moment he asked her (the caller, not the neighbor who had seen the "break-in"), she could not clearly see the skin tone of one of the men. Your point is entirely moot, however, because Gates told the police that he and his driver were trying to force the door open with a shoulder because the door was malfunctioning. It was an honest mistake by an alert neighbor and it could have been dealt with in less than one minute if Gates cooperated. If it happened to me, I probably would have had a good laugh about it - it would be a good story to tell.
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  #19  
Old 07-29-2009, 02:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Play The Man
The woman making the phone call and the woman that initially saw the "break-in" are two different people. The caller was told by an elderly neighbor of Gate's that she witnessed a "break-in". The caller was asked by the dispatcher in "real time" about the race of the suspects. At the moment he asked her (the caller, not the neighbor who had seen the "break-in"), she could not clearly see the skin tone of one of the men. Your point is entirely moot, however, because Gates told the police that he and his driver were trying to force the door open with a shoulder because the door was malfunctioning. It was an honest mistake by an alert neighbor and it could have been dealt with in less than one minute if Gates cooperated. If it happened to me, I probably would have had a good laugh about it - it would be a good story to tell.
My point is moot? Did you not read my post correctly or something? or did you just pick and choose what to read? Right after i commented on the "obstructed view" topic, i said that this was NOT really the point i wanted to make, and I then posted more things right after, to try and give another perspective to the story. The second part of my most occupied about 90% of what I was trying to get across.
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  #20  
Old 07-29-2009, 02:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mscomc
Sure in hindsight, maybe the Gates acted a little foolishly and a little hot-headed, but I have yet to hear the full transcript from the police of the entire incident from gates and the officer. On ABC nightly news the other night, all i heard was a segment with the cop saying "the individual claims he lives here, but hes being un-cooperative, keep the cars coming"...or something to that effect.
I guess you are more cautious than President Obama, because before he heard a full transcript he said that the police officer "acted stupidly". He has yet to apologize. Acting "hot-headed" is called "disorderly conduct", especially when you insult the mother of the officer who has the discretion of whether to arrest you or not.
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