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  #21  
Old 06-20-2009, 02:35 AM
surveyorshawn
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Originally Posted by mikthehick
Yeah Dave, I agree with Bonnie there, it's also about portion control. Also, drink that water like we said in an earlier thread.

I'll be honest, I haven't worked out in a week (I went on Wednesday, but the instructor didn't show). But even though, I haven't gone 'hog wild' on the food either. So in essence, I won't gain weight, but may lose muscle tone.

I'll be ready to hit up both gyms on Monday after beach weekend!

As far as portions go, Dave, it is recommended that you eat only one portion of each thing (meat, green vegetable, starch, etc) at each meal (5-6 meals per day) and that each portion should be either the size of the palm of your hand or your closed fist, depending upon what food it is.
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  #22  
Old 06-20-2009, 02:53 AM
Bonnie Bonnie is offline
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Originally Posted by surveyorshawn
As far as portions go, Dave, it is recommended that you eat only one portion of each thing (meat, green vegetable, starch, etc) at each meal (5-6 meals per day) and that each portion should be either the size of the palm of your hand or your closed fist, depending upon what food it is.
Someone told me that too, Shawn: Protein would be the size of your open palm, starch would be the size of the side of your closed fist and then green vegetables unlimited (not vegies that are considered starches).
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  #23  
Old 06-20-2009, 03:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Bonnie
Someone told me that too, Shawn: Protein would be the size of your open palm, starch would be the size of the side of your closed fist and then green vegetables unlimited (not vegies that are considered starches).
Yep, that's it! Thanks for expounding on it...I had forgotten which was which, lol
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  #24  
Old 06-21-2009, 11:11 PM
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Originally Posted by VCURamFan
Well, it doesn't really matter, then, because regardless of what they should be labeled, if the US calls 'em "yams", then they're yams, dern it!!!
Hey Ben...so I bought two sweet potatoes this week...ive never eaten them before, so I'll tell you what its like when I do...do you cook them like normal spuds...or what
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Old 06-21-2009, 11:23 PM
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Hey Ben...so I bought two sweet potatoes this week...ive never eaten them before, so I'll tell you what its like when I do...do you cook them like normal spuds...or what
Most people bake them like regular potatoes, and flavor them with cinnamon, sugar (I use a substitute), and some light butter.
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  #26  
Old 06-22-2009, 02:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Bonnie
Okay, Rockdawg, let's get it on, baby. I can "Google" too, ya know. And, I'm going to disagree with you about Canola oil not being better/healthier for you than vegetable oil. I read about rapeseed oil and it's uses in lamps and as a lubricant in steam engines for ships during WWII. What they produce today from rapeseed to make Canola oil is considered safe for human consumption. The seeds are used to produce edible oil fit for human consumption because it has lower levels of erucic acid than traditional rapeseed oils. Hence, the name "canola" from "Canadian oil, low acid".

Both Canola Oil and Olive Oil have very low saturated fat and high monounsaturated fat content(s). That's why they are better for you than vegetable oil (partially hydrogenated/trans fat).

Vegetable oil is "partially hydrogenated" oil that contains trans fat. Trans fat is made in a chemical process called "partial hydrogenation", designed to increase the shelf life and flavor stability of foods. During this process, hydrogen is added to vegetable oils resulting in the reconfiguration of fat molecules to create trans fat. Trans fat is typically present in products w/ingredient lists that include partially hydrogenated oils. If you see ingredients referred to as "partially hydrogenated" or "shortening", you've got trans fat.

Avoid: partially hydrogenated oils (vegetable), hydrogenated oils (solids/shortening), palm kernal oil and coconut oil.

As for potatoes, I read where potatoes are a real good source of vitamins as well as fiber as long as you eat them plain without all the butter, sour cream, cheese, etc...

Russet/Idaho potato - high starch content

Round Red aka "new" - low starch content, high in fiber eaten with skins on

Look in your pantry and see how many products say "partially hydrogenated" on the label. You'll be surprised (not in a good way ).

*NOTE: Info gathered (some word for word) from Wikipedia and another source I "Googled".
Bonnie, I didn't Google it, or use Yahoo, I read lots and lots of books and have known this information for years, long before the trans fat debate was made popular by news media outlets. In fact, we studied cooking oils when I took chemistry in college. I agree that canola oil is better than vegetable oil, but it still shouldn't be consumed.

All this info is fine, but that doesn't change the fact that vegetable oil and canola oil are processed oils. Canola oil also contains a very low smoking temperature, making it very easy to chemically change into trans fats, which is one of the reasons why it shouldn't be used for cooking. At room temperature, it's probably ok, but there are still plenty of other oils that would be much better, and have more flavor ;)

Keep in mind, saturated fat is not entirely your enemy. Saturated fat is essential for the production of testosterone, thus increasing levels of human growth hormone and IGF-1, as well as other hormones within the body. And yes, this is still important to women. However, we shouldn't consume large amounts of it, probably 10-15% of the daily fat intake should be saturated fat, as the remaining sat fat ultimately stores in the arteries, on vital organs, or on the body as body fat.

I'm not 100% sure about avoiding or non-avoiding coconut oil. There is a high level of saturated fat, but the sat fat contained within coconut oil are medium-chain triglycerides, the same fatty cell configuration as mother's breast milk, so they claim is being made that it can help with building muscle/cutting fat, but I don't think anything conclusive has been revealed. Personally, I don't consume it. Most of the fat I consume comes from flaxseed oil or Udo's 3-6-9 blend.

And yeah, I've seen some of those sites about Canola Oil. Some of the claims are pretty funny. The funniest one I've seen was that rapeseed oil is a primary ingredient in mustard gas. Mustard gas simply gets the name from its' distinct odor that smells like, well, mustard.

Oh, and one more thing, trust me, my pantry doesn't contain hardly any items that read "vegetable oil", "canola oil", "partially hydrogenated oil", or "hydrogenated oil". I'm too big of a health nut for that, so I look at everything that I buy when I'm in the store. I use mostly dry ingredients and cook everything myself since it's cheaper and healthier. However, I do have 1 cheat meal a week, and I spare NO expense to what I'm consuming
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  #27  
Old 06-22-2009, 05:43 AM
Bonnie Bonnie is offline
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Originally Posted by rockdawg21
Bonnie, I didn't Google it, or use Yahoo, I read lots and lots of books and have known this information for years, long before the trans fat debate was made popular by news media outlets. In fact, we studied cooking oils when I took chemistry in college. I agree that canola oil is better than vegetable oil, but it still shouldn't be consumed.

All this info is fine, but that doesn't change the fact that vegetable oil and canola oil are processed oils. Canola oil also contains a very low smoking temperature, making it very easy to chemically change into trans fats, which is one of the reasons why it shouldn't be used for cooking. At room temperature, it's probably ok, but there are still plenty of other oils that would be much better, and have more flavor ;)

Keep in mind, saturated fat is not entirely your enemy. Saturated fat is essential for the production of testosterone, thus increasing levels of human growth hormone and IGF-1, as well as other hormones within the body. And yes, this is still important to women. However, we shouldn't consume large amounts of it, probably 10-15% of the daily fat intake should be saturated fat, as the remaining sat fat ultimately stores in the arteries, on vital organs, or on the body as body fat.

I'm not 100% sure about avoiding or non-avoiding coconut oil. There is a high level of saturated fat, but the sat fat contained within coconut oil are medium-chain triglycerides, the same fatty cell configuration as mother's breast milk, so they claim is being made that it can help with building muscle/cutting fat, but I don't think anything conclusive has been revealed. Personally, I don't consume it. Most of the fat I consume comes from flaxseed oil or Udo's 3-6-9 blend.

And yeah, I've seen some of those sites about Canola Oil. Some of the claims are pretty funny. The funniest one I've seen was that rapeseed oil is a primary ingredient in mustard gas. Mustard gas simply gets the name from its' distinct odor that smells like, well, mustard.

Oh, and one more thing, trust me, my pantry doesn't contain hardly any items that read "vegetable oil", "canola oil", "partially hydrogenated oil", or "hydrogenated oil". I'm too big of a health nut for that, so I look at everything that I buy when I'm in the store. I use mostly dry ingredients and cook everything myself since it's cheaper and healthier. However, I do have 1 cheat meal a week, and I spare NO expense to what I'm consuming
I stand corrected on where you get your info, although, the site I chose to research from gave some of the "exact" same info you stated regarding it's history to it's present-day name, etc... the information we've both "read" has to be coming from some same sources. I did read where genetic engineering is going on; this is true for soy and corn also. I'm going to ask my doc, why he has canola oil listed as one I should be using since he is in favor of "natural" foods and processes. If I get any new info from him on this, I'll check back in with you.

I'm always interested in learning more about nutrition and what I'm "actually" eating these days. The more I learn the more alarmed I am by what we (public) are putting in our bodies. And, I do admit I'm still trying to overcome and conquer some bad eating habits. I'm an avid "label" reader so I can't use the excuse "I didn't know" when I'm weak and fudge.

Oh, btw, when I said to check the pantry, I didn't mean just you, I was talking to anyone on here interested in what we're discussing and interested in "discovering" what's in their pantries.

Interesting about the low-smoking temperature changing the canola into trans fat. Is this also true for olive oil (even though it's natural) which also, I've read and been told, has a low-smoking temperature?

Thanks for sharing.
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  #28  
Old 06-22-2009, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Bonnie
I stand corrected on where you get your info, although, the site I chose to research from gave some of the "exact" same info you stated regarding it's history to it's present-day name, etc... the information we've both "read" has to be coming from some same sources. I did read where genetic engineering is going on; this is true for soy and corn also. I'm going to ask my doc, why he has canola oil listed as one I should be using since he is in favor of "natural" foods and processes. If I get any new info from him on this, I'll check back in with you.

I'm always interested in learning more about nutrition and what I'm "actually" eating these days. The more I learn the more alarmed I am by what we (public) are putting in our bodies. And, I do admit I'm still trying to overcome and conquer some bad eating habits. I'm an avid "label" reader so I can't use the excuse "I didn't know" when I'm weak and fudge.

Oh, btw, when I said to check the pantry, I didn't mean just you, I was talking to anyone on here interested in what we're discussing and interested in "discovering" what's in their pantries.

Interesting about the low-smoking temperature changing the canola into trans fat. Is this also true for olive oil (even though it's natural) which also, I've read and been told, has a low-smoking temperature?

Thanks for sharing.
Haha, it's no big deal, I eat lots of meat and I'm sure it's steroid injected and blah blah blah, it's still meat, all the steroids/hgh do is make the animal bigger.

I made a mistake about canola oil having a low smoking temperature, it's around 400, which is plenty to fry, but I still say it should be avoided because it comes from a genetically produced seed and is highly processed unlike evoo, sunflower, sesame, flaxseed (don't cook with flaxseed), etc. which are simply pressed from the seeds themselves (cold-pressed is the best option). It's like eating Subway turkey sandwich vs. a whole cut turkey sandwich, there's no comparison in the amount of protein, quality of protein, texture, and nutrients between processed deli meats and a whole cut of meat.

Yeah, soy and corn oil are to be avoided too. Soy makes up virtually all of the vegetable oil in the U.S., so when you're looking at foods and they don't say "vegetable oil", but they say "soybean oil", put it back on the shelf. Cottonseed oil is one that's popular with Planter's nuts. Either go for the dry roasted versions of nuts or even go organic (if you're interested, I buy organic cashews in bulk from www.tierrafarm.com, they also have almonds, pecans, dried fruits, etc.)

There's a great resource online regarding cooking oils and their smoking temperatures. You'd be surprised to find out that extra virgin olive oil isn't great for cooking because it has a low smoking temperature, but, regular olive oil has a much higher smoking temperature, which is more recommended for frying or baking. The only thing is, it has much less flavor than evoo. This is probably the most complete site I've ever seen regarding the differences between cooking oils:
http://missvickie.com/howto/spices/oils.html

Yeah, ask your doctor about the canola oil. I'd suggest approaching him with how it's made, I'll bet he doesn't have a clue that it comes from genetically modified rapeseed
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  #29  
Old 06-22-2009, 01:59 PM
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Gonna get some RAPEseed oil just because it sounds wicked.

I love white rice. Don't care about the nutritional value. Goes great with my steamed fish.
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  #30  
Old 06-22-2009, 02:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockdawg21
Bonnie, I didn't Google it, or use Yahoo, I read lots and lots of books and have known this information for years, long before the trans fat debate was made popular by news media outlets. In fact, we studied cooking oils when I took chemistry in college. I agree that canola oil is better than vegetable oil, but it still shouldn't be consumed.

All this info is fine, but that doesn't change the fact that vegetable oil and canola oil are processed oils. Canola oil also contains a very low smoking temperature, making it very easy to chemically change into trans fats, which is one of the reasons why it shouldn't be used for cooking. At room temperature, it's probably ok, but there are still plenty of other oils that would be much better, and have more flavor ;)

Keep in mind, saturated fat is not entirely your enemy. Saturated fat is essential for the production of testosterone, thus increasing levels of human growth hormone and IGF-1, as well as other hormones within the body. And yes, this is still important to women. However, we shouldn't consume large amounts of it, probably 10-15% of the daily fat intake should be saturated fat, as the remaining sat fat ultimately stores in the arteries, on vital organs, or on the body as body fat.

I'm not 100% sure about avoiding or non-avoiding coconut oil. There is a high level of saturated fat, but the sat fat contained within coconut oil are medium-chain triglycerides, the same fatty cell configuration as mother's breast milk, so they claim is being made that it can help with building muscle/cutting fat, but I don't think anything conclusive has been revealed. Personally, I don't consume it. Most of the fat I consume comes from flaxseed oil or Udo's 3-6-9 blend.

And yeah, I've seen some of those sites about Canola Oil. Some of the claims are pretty funny. The funniest one I've seen was that rapeseed oil is a primary ingredient in mustard gas. Mustard gas simply gets the name from its' distinct odor that smells like, well, mustard.

Oh, and one more thing, trust me, my pantry doesn't contain hardly any items that read "vegetable oil", "canola oil", "partially hydrogenated oil", or "hydrogenated oil". I'm too big of a health nut for that, so I look at everything that I buy when I'm in the store. I use mostly dry ingredients and cook everything myself since it's cheaper and healthier. However, I do have 1 cheat meal a week, and I spare NO expense to what I'm consuming
but I never asked about Oil...I asked about potatoes...I only use onecal spray for oil...and never marge or butter...so I dont really care.

but I DO care about potatoes
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