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  #71  
Old 03-27-2009, 04:46 PM
Bonnie Bonnie is online now
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Originally Posted by Moose
Fixed.


There are different catagories/sub-genres within the "romance" genre: paranormal, fantasy, suspense/mystery, contemporary, inspirational (christian), regency, historical, erotica, etc...

Hmmm...I'm thinking I definitely have a lock on which "target market" you fit into, Moose.

Last edited by Bonnie; 03-28-2009 at 03:30 AM.
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  #72  
Old 03-27-2009, 05:31 PM
Bonnie Bonnie is online now
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Originally Posted by NateR
It is very difficult to build a story from scratch. There are big decisions that must be made early on and can't be changed easily afterward (for instance, am I going to tell this story in 1st, 2nd, or 3rd person?).

I designed Stump back in 1993 and had a basic story worked out by 1997. However, I didn't come up with an origin for the character, that I was happy with, until 2005. So there's been a lot of false starts, but I've decided that I've had the character running around in my head for 16 years, I need to let him out sooner rather than later.

Did you ever get your romance novel written?
No, we only got so far in class and so my characters and story weren't fully developed. I was hoping they would offer more classes (with the same teacher), but they discontinued it. Like you said, there is a lot you have to think about and work out at the beginning from that "blank" page. But, I haven't given up on it. I really like the "suspense/mystery" sub-genre. I like a good solid story with the romance built in at the appropriate time.

I hate books where the characters meet on page 5, are having sex by page 7 and are madly in love after five days of knowing each other. So unreal! Probably the kind of "simple" plot Moose is thinking of.

You talk like a "writer" when you say you have to "let him out..." They use to have this huge "national" convention of writers in Beaumont (where I'm originally from) every year and I got to go one year. They would get different authors from different genres (romance, western, sci-fi, etc...) to come and give lectures/seminars on their specific genre. They talked about writing, the stumbling blocks, the rejections, and the triumph of getting their first book deal.

These authors, of course, were all published (Nora Roberts and William Johnstone to mention two) and hard core about their writing. William Johnstone talked about how he would sequester himself away on his property and all he would do is write. His family knew not to disturb him during this time. Anyway, all of them had that "character" inside their head that they just had to get out. It was fascinating. At the end of the three days, they had a greet/meet and you could talk with them. They were all so friendly and couldn't wait to talk to you about the subject, their books and characters. For them, their characters are very "real" people.

It sounds like you've developed your story quite a bit and got past those initial stumbling blocks of starting from scratch. I don't know how it works with comics but in other writing, you have to "grab" the reader right from the start. You know, get them to want to turn the page. Just thinking about it, it seems doing a "hero" comic might be even harder than other genres because you really are creating this "fantasic" character. I can't wait to see him on the page, Nate.

Btw, I met Nora Roberts (her books are everywhere now) at that convention I mentioned. She was the "only" author I met that did not come off so friendly. Turns out several years later when I took this course, my teacher knew her and said she was super nice. Go figure! Anyway, my teacher was telling us how her and Nora Roberts were down in Florida at a convention and just so happens while they were there, a body comes floating up on the beach. My first thought was, "Wow!" that would make a great opening to a story...

Last edited by Bonnie; 03-27-2009 at 05:52 PM.
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  #73  
Old 03-27-2009, 05:52 PM
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Tyburn Tyburn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NateR
1993
1997.
2005.
So which do you date his Creation from
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  #74  
Old 03-27-2009, 06:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie
No, we only got so far in class and so my characters and story weren't fully developed. I was hoping they would offer more classes (with the same teacher), but they discontinued it. Like you said, there is a lot you have to think about and work out at the beginning from that "blank" page. But, I haven't given up on it. I really like the "suspense/mystery" sub-genre. I like a good solid story with the romance built in at the appropriate time.

I hate books where the characters meet on page 5, are having sex by page 7 and are madly in love after five days of knowing each other. So unreal! Probably the kind of "simple" plot Moose is thinking of.

You talk like a "writer" when you say you have to "let him out..." They use to have this huge "national" convention of writers in Beaumont (where I'm originally from) every year and I got to go one year. They would get different authors from different genres (romance, western, sci-fi, etc...) to come and give lectures/seminars on their specific genre. They talked about writing, the stumbling blocks, the rejections, and the triumph of getting their first book deal.

These authors, of course, were all published (Nora Roberts and William Johnstone to mention two) and hard core about their writing. William Johnstone talked about how he would sequester himself away on his property and all he would do is write. His family knew not to disturb him during this time. Anyway, all of them had that "character" inside their head that they just had to get out. It was fascinating. At the end of the three days, they had a greet/meet and you could talk with them. They were all so friendly and couldn't wait to talk to you about the subject, their books and characters. For them, their characters are very "real" people.

It sounds like you've developed your story quite a bit and got past those initial stumbling blocks of starting from scratch. I don't know how it works with comics but in other writing, you have to "grab" the reader right from the start. You know, get them to want to turn the page. Just thinking about it, it seems doing a "hero" comic might be even harder than other genres because you really are creating this "fantasic" character. I can't wait to see him on the page, Nate.

Btw, I met Nora Roberts (her books are everywhere now) at that convention I mentioned. She was the "only" author I met that did not come off so friendly. Turns out several years later when I took this course, my teacher knew her and said she was super nice. Go figure! Anyway, my teacher was telling us how her and Nora Roberts were down in Florida at a convention and just so happens while they were there, a body comes floating up on the beach. My first thought was, "Wow!" that would make a great opening to a story...
Well, comic book have traditionally been considered a "disposable medium." Up until the 1970s, not a lot of thought was put into the individual storylines. If you read some of the old comics from the 1960s, you can see that they were essentially writing on the fly without putting much thought into the characters or the logic of the events. You can even find major mistakes that would never have been overlooked if the stories had gone through the simplest of rewrites (in Amazing Spider-Man #2 from 1962, Spider-Man is actually referred to as "Superman" by one of his villains.)

Nowadays, though, one issue of a comic will run about $3.99 (versus $0.12 back in the 60s), so people demand more detailed, polished and fleshed out storylines and characters. Unfortunately, the trade off is that stories that would have been told in one issue of a comic in the 60s can take up to 3 or 4 issues of modern comics.

However, the level of writing is still not up to the level to justify $12-16 for a story that would have only cost you 12 cents 40 years ago. Most of that is just due to the fact that the writing, while more detailed, is still rushed by publishing schedules.

So, I'm working towards a mini-series that will have an overarching plot line, but each issue will also have it's own self-contained story, that isn't necessarily related to the greater story. I would rather have one 4-6 issue mini-series that people can read over and over again and discover new details each time, than to put out 100 rushed issues with forgettable characters and stories. Which is why it was so important for me to actually flesh out Stump's origin and not just make it up as I go along (a mistake that a lot of comic book writers make).

It's taken me 16 years so far, but it took J.R.R. Tolkien over 20 years to write Lord of the Rings (to his defense, there was a little thing called World War 2 distracting him), so I'm not doing too bad.
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  #75  
Old 03-27-2009, 06:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyburn
So which do you date his Creation from
1993, because the basic look and name for the character hasn't changed since then. The biggest difference is his height, which started out as 4' 3" but was eventually raised to around 5' 5" or 5' 6" (roughly Sean Sherk's height, maybe a little shorter).

Also the basic story of his appearance on Earth hasn't changed. He came crashing to Earth like a meteor in 1993 and that's pretty much what happens to him in the current story.
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  #76  
Old 03-27-2009, 06:46 PM
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I love LOTR



War Stump!
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  #77  
Old 03-29-2009, 12:35 AM
Moose
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie


There are different catagories/sub-genres within the "romance" genre: paranormal, fantasy, suspense/mystery, contemporary, inspirational (christian), regency, historical, erotica, etc...

Hmmm...I'm thinking I definitely have a lock on which "target market" you fit into, Moose.
Sorry, I had no clue. Inspirational romance? I can see why it's considered 'fiction'.
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