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Old 01-24-2013, 04:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NateR View Post
http://news.yahoo.com/ap-sources-pan...-politics.html



This is a terrible idea, unless they start holding women to the same physical fitness standards that they require of male soldiers. If they lower the standards in order to accommodate women, then that is just going to result in a weaker US military across the board.
I agree with you, Nate, and with the conclusion you draw. Captain Katie Petronio, USMC, also agrees. Here is her excellent article on the subject and I'll post a couple particularly relevent paragraphs.

Get over it! We are not all created equal.

Quote:
Who is driving this agenda? I am not personally hearing female Marines, enlisted or officer, pounding on the doors of Congress claiming that their inability to serve in the infantry violates their right to equality. Shockingly, this isnít even a congressional agenda. This issue is being pushed by several groups, one of which is a small committee of civilians appointed by the Secretary of Defense called the Defense Advisory Committee on Women in the Service (DACOWITS). Their mission is to advise the Department of Defense (DoD) on recommendations, as well as matters of policy, pertaining to the well-being of women in the Armed Services from recruiting to employment. Members are selected based on their prior military experience or experience with womenís workforce issues. I certainly applaud and appreciate DACOWITSí mission; however, as it pertains to the issue of women in the infantry, itís very surprising to see that none of the committee members are on active duty or have any recent combat or relevant operational experience relating to the issue they are attempting to change. I say this because, at the end of the day, itís the active duty servicemember who will ultimately deal with the results of their initiatives, not those on the outside looking in.

*snip*

By the fifth month into the deployment, I had muscle atrophy in my thighs that was causing me to constantly trip and my legs to buckle with the slightest grade change. My agility during firefights and mobility on and off vehicles and perimeter walls was seriously hindering my response time and overall capability. It was evident that stress and muscular deterioration was affecting everyone regardless of gender; however, the rate of my deterioration was noticeably faster than that of male Marines and further compounded by gender-specific medical conditions. At the end of the 7-month deployment, and the construction of 18 PBs later, I had lost 17 pounds and was diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome (which personally resulted in infertility, but is not a genetic trend in my family), which was brought on by the chemical and physical changes endured during deployment. Regardless of my deteriorating physical stature, I was extremely successful during both of my combat tours, serving beside my infantry brethren and gaining the respect of every unit I supported. Regardless, I can say with 100 percent assurance that despite my accomplishments, there is no way I could endure the physical demands of the infantrymen whom I worked beside as their combat load and constant deployment cycle would leave me facing medical separation long before the option of retirement. I understand that everyone is affected differently; however, I am confident that should the Marine Corps attempt to fully integrate women into the infantry, we as an institution are going to experience a colossal increase in crippling and career-ending medical conditions for females.
Men and women are different no matter how the lefties try to pretend (or worse - legislate) otherwise.
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