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-   -   It's Giraffe Season in Zanesville, OH (http://www.matt-hughes.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8678)

VCURamFan 10-19-2011 12:43 PM

It's Giraffe Season in Zanesville, OH
 
Matt, if you've ever wanted to bag yourself an animal on the endangered species list, now prolly your best shot (pun intended :wink: )

Quote:

http://a57.foxnews.com/static/manage...ic_animals.jpg
Dozens of animals escaped from a wild-animal preserve that houses bears, big cats and other beasts, and the owner later was found dead there, said police, who shot several of the animals and urged nearby residents to stay indoors.

The fences had been left unsecured Tuesday at the Muskingum County Animal Farm in Zanesville, in east-central Ohio, and the animals' cages were open, police said. They wouldn't say what animals escaped but said the preserve had lions, tigers, cheetahs, wolves, giraffes, camels and bears. They said bears and wolves were among 25 escaped animals that had been shot and killed and there were multiple sightings of exotic animals along a nearby highway.

"These are wild animals that you would see on TV in Africa," Sheriff Matt Lutz warned at a press conference.

Neighbor Danielle White, whose father's property abuts the animal preserve, said she didn't see loose animals this time but did in 2006, when a lion escaped.

"It's always been a fear of mine knowing (the preserve's owner) had all those animals," she said. "I have kids. I've heard a male lion roar all night."

Lutz called the escaped animals "mature, very big, aggressive" but said a caretaker told authorities the preserve's 48 animals had been fed on Monday. He said police were patrolling the 40-acre farm and the surrounding areas in cars, not on foot, and were concerned about big cats and bears hiding in the dark and in trees.

"This is a bad situation," Lutz said. "It's been a situation for a long time."

Lutz said his office started getting phone calls at about 5:30 p.m. that wild animals were loose just west of Zanesville on a road that runs under Interstate 70.

He said four deputies with assault rifles in a pickup truck went to the animal farm, where they found the owner, Terry Thompson, dead and all the animal cage doors open. He wouldn't say how Thompson died but said several aggressive animals were near his body when deputies arrived and had to be shot.

Thompson, who lived on the property, had orangutans and chimps in his home, but those were still in their cages, Lutz said.

The deputies, who saw many other animals standing outside their cages and others that had escaped past the fencing surrounding the property, began shooting them on sight. They said there had been no reports of injuries among the public.

Staffers from the Columbus Zoo went to the scene, hoping to tranquilize and capture the animals. The sheriff said caretakers might put food in the animals' open cages to try to lure them back.

Lutz said people should stay indoors and he might ask for local schools to close Wednesday. At least four school districts in the area canceled classes.

Lutz said his main concern was protecting the public in the rural area, where homes sit on large lots of sometimes 10 acres (four hectares).
"Any kind of cat species or bear species is what we are concerned about," Lutz said. "We don't know how much of a head start these animals have on us."

A spokeswoman for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, which usually handles native wildlife, such as deer, said state Division of Wildlife officers were helping the sheriff's office cope with the exotic animals in Zanesville, a city of about 25,000 residents.

"This is, I would say, unique," spokeswoman Laura Jones said.

White, the preserve's neighbor, said Thompson had been in legal trouble, and police said he had gotten out of jail recently.

At a nearby Moose Lodge, Bill Weiser remembered Thompson as an interesting character who flew planes, raced boats and owned a custom motorcycle shop that also sold guns.

"He was pretty unique," Weiser said. "He had a different slant on things. I never knew him to hurt anybody, and he took good care of the animals."

Ohio has some of the nation's weakest restrictions on exotic pets and among the highest number of injuries and deaths caused by them.

In the summer of 2010, an animal caretaker was killed by a bear at a property in Cleveland. The caretaker had opened the bear's cage at exotic-animal keeper Sam Mazzola's property for a routine feeding.

Though animal-welfare activists had wanted Mazzola charged with reckless homicide, the caretaker's death was ruled a workplace accident. The bear was later destroyed.

This summer, Mazzola was found dead on a water bed, wearing a mask and with his arms and legs restrained, at his home in Columbia Township, about 15 miles southwest of Cleveland.

It was unclear how many animals remained on the property when he died, but he had said in a bankruptcy filing in May 2010 that he owned four tigers, a lion, eight bears and 12 wolves. The U.S. Department of Agriculture had revoked his license to exhibit animals after animal-welfare activists campaigned for him to stop letting people wrestle with another one of his bears.

Mazzola had permits for nine bears for 2010, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources said. The state requires permits for bears but doesn't regulate the ownership of nonnative animals, such as lions and tigers.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/10/19...#ixzz1bENGcW4Q

flo 10-19-2011 04:55 PM

Quote:

Ohio has some of the nation's weakest restrictions on exotic pets and among the highest number of injuries and deaths caused by them.
This is just such a sad story. Exotics should be banned in the US. It's a horrible life for the animals and - as this story so well illustrates - a real danger to the public. I could hear the lion roaring every morning at the Sequim Game Farm, ugh. It was an awful place.

Quote:

This summer, Mazzola was found dead on a water bed, wearing a mask and with his arms and legs restrained, at his home in Columbia Township, about 15 miles southwest of Cleveland
W-T-H?!? :scared0015:

County Mike 10-19-2011 05:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by flo (Post 177928)
W-T-H?!? :scared0015:

Like you haven't done that.

VCURamFan 10-19-2011 05:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by flo (Post 177928)
W-T-H?!? :scared0015:

See, that 2nd half of the story was kinda confusing. I mean, Mazzola wasn't the guy in Zanesville, right? It sounds like this was a different case that they're referencing?

flo 10-19-2011 06:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by County Mike (Post 177931)
Like you haven't done that.

:fryingpan: take that, green man! :laugh:

Quote:

Originally Posted by VCURamFan (Post 177932)
See, that 2nd half of the story was kinda confusing. I mean, Mazzola wasn't the guy in Zanesville, right? It sounds like this was a different case that they're referencing?

Yeah, I'm not sure why they included that little tidbit in the story, except that they both had exotics...:unsure:

Bonnie 10-20-2011 04:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by County Mike (Post 177931)
Like you haven't done that.

:laugh:

On the news, yesterday, they said the owner had deliberately let them go before killing himself; the article makes it sound like they escaped. :unsure-1:

Neezar 10-21-2011 02:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bonnie (Post 178004)
:laugh:

On the news, yesterday, they said the owner had deliberately let them go before killing himself; the article makes it sound like they escaped. :unsure-1:

That doesn't ring true with me if he cared anything at all about the animals. He must have known that would get them killed by the locals.


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