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BamaGrits84
03-16-2011, 07:41 PM
From foxnews.com

Amid Protest, Florida School Stands Behind Tough New Peanut Allergy Regulations
By Mary Quinn O'Connor

Published March 15, 2011


Despite protests by angry parents, a school in Florida is standing behind its decision to implement new regulations to protect a first grade student suffering from a severe peanut allergy.

Students at Edgewater Elementary are required to wash their hands and rinse their mouths out before entering the classroom each morning and after lunch. Teachers, who monitor the daily rinsing, must also ensure that desks are being continually wiped down with Clorox wipes. The school has banned all peanut products, eliminated snacks in the classroom and prevented outside food at holiday parties. And last week a peanut-sniffing dog was brought into the school.

District spokeswoman Nancy Wait of Volusia County Schools said the school is legally obligated to take these safety precautions because of the Federal Disabilities Act.

“It would be the same thing as putting a handicap ramp for a student that is physically disabled. The only difference with this is that is affects other students,” she told FoxNews.com.

But some parents are saying it is taking away from their children’s learning time.

“On average, it’s probably taking a good 30 minutes out of the day. That’s my child’s education. Thirty minutes could be a while subject,” Carrie Starkey told FoxNews.com.

On Thursday she and other parents protested outside the school, picketing with signs that said, “Our Kids Have Rights Too.”

Experts say the school may have gone too far and that there are easier ways to protect the child.

“I have never seen anything like this,” said allergist Dr. Scott Sicherer with the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network or FAAN, an organization that monitors national food allergy issues. “There are many guidelines on how to manage food allergies in schools… things like no food sharing. There are plenty of relatively simple things the school could put in place that aren’t burdensome,” said Sicherer.

But David Bailey, the father of girl with life threatening food allergy, says that if his daughter even smells peanuts, her reaction could be fatal. "We've fought very hard to put certain things in place… to keep her alive… in school," he told MyFoxOrlando. "She's already a cast-out. She can't do things that most kids can do."

While the school’s actions may seem drastic and invasive the school says it must protect the health of the student.

“It may seem like an inconvenience but this student registered her disability at the beginning of the school year and we have to do these things to give her a safe learning environment,” said Wait. Since the protest was held last week, parents will be looking for some sort of compromise from the school administration.

“We understand that they need to protect this girl, but these measures are just extreme. Procedures need to be set in place, but not procedures that will take away from our children’s education,” said Starkey.



While I feel badly for this child, and her parents, I don't think this is fair to the other students. At some point with an allergy this serious the girl's parents need to begin teaching her how to adapt to her enviroment because all enviroments cannot be adapted to her. I know it would be hard for a child to deal with this, but a mask and gloves would protect her the same it seems.

Miss Foxy
03-16-2011, 07:46 PM
I don't think that's taking it too far it's not the childs fault he/she has medical problems. He/she did not ask to be born that way and deserves and education like everyone else. If that were my child I would want the same. Society can't throw this child away, because 30 minutes are impacted.

Spiritwalker
03-16-2011, 07:48 PM
From foxnews.com

While I feel badly for this child, and her parents, I don't think this is fair to the other students. At some point with an allergy this serious the girl's parents need to begin teaching her how to adapt to her enviroment because all enviroments cannot be adapted to her. I know it would be hard for a child to deal with this, but a mask and gloves would protect her the same it seems.

Agreed...

and it is effecting other homes... what about the families that have to live off peanut butter for their kids?? What do they do...

In my local schools.. if kids do not have lunch money.. or their "lunch account" runs out.. the school will give the kids a PB&J an apple and milk free for a time.. well in this case.. what do the schools feed the underpreviliged kids?

I complete understand the "general need" The Dr. said it very well..

“There are many guidelines on how to manage food allergies in schools… things like no food sharing. There are plenty of relatively simple things the school could put in place that aren’t burdensome,” said Sicherer.


If her allergy is THAT serious .. that "peanut breath" can cause harm.. then maybe she needs to be in a different school.. not the best solution.. but if one of my kids could DIE.. from coming in contact with a peanut.. Home schooling.. government help to put them in a private school.. something like that...


"We've fought very hard to put certain things in place… to keep her alive… in school," he told MyFoxOrlando. "She's already a cast-out. She can't do things that most kids can do."


Sorry to say... putting your kid in public school.. with that bad of an allergy.. your asking for problems.. not just from the school.. kids can be very evil.. and not even mean it... "What you can't smell THIS".. and shoves a PB&J in front of her.. You think that wouldn't happen.. or something similiar???

flo
03-16-2011, 08:07 PM
I want to say my heart goes out to any child suffering from such a debilitating allergy.

That said, it's never a good idea to demand all change for the benefit of one, or a few. It makes much more sense for the girl to use gloves and a mask, if her allergy is that sensitive.

This reminds me of a city council member from my old town. She had dust, scent and other allergies and kept making the city move the meeting place, use certain paints and wall coverings, the list went on and on. They moved the meetings location at least 3 times and it was still not adequate. She finally resigned under growing pressure to do so but was considering a lawsuit, IIRC.

flo
03-16-2011, 08:08 PM
And last week a peanut-sniffing dog was brought into the school.



Are you kidding me?

Two words. Home school.

BamaGrits84
03-16-2011, 08:11 PM
That said, it's never a good idea to demand all change for the benefit of one, or a few.

Wow you just summed up the problems with how the legal system has turned into an advocate for the minority of citizens instead of siding with what the majority of American wants.

County Mike
03-16-2011, 08:13 PM
Unfortunately, home school or private tutors might be the best option here. SW is right. Some kid will think it's funny to put a bag of peanuts in her desk. If my daughter was at that great of a risk, I'd keep her home until there was some way to allow her around a moderate amount of peanuts without her dying from it.

Chuck
03-16-2011, 09:53 PM
“On average, it’s probably taking a good 30 minutes out of the day. That’s my child’s education. Thirty minutes could be a while subject,” Carrie Starkey told FoxNews.com.
I know I'm being petty but I think typo's in a quote about education are just a little funny. :Whistle:


Society can't throw this child away, because 30 minutes are impacted.
I don't think anybody is suggesting that, do you? :huh:

Unfortunately, home school or private tutors might be the best option here.
Hey watch it buster!! :punch: :laugh:

As a parent of 4 home educated children I happen to think that's a great first choice not a last resort. Nothing unfortunate about choosing home education brother. It's a great choice for some (not all) families. :D

Miss Foxy
03-16-2011, 09:55 PM
I know I'm being petty but I think typo's in a quote about education are just a little funny. :Whistle:



I don't think anybody is suggesting that, do you? :huh:Hey watch it buster!! :punch: :laugh:

As a parent of 4 home educated children I happen to think that's a great first choice not a last resort. Nothing unfortunate about choosing home education brother. It's a great choice for some (not all) families. :D

If anyone would have said that I would have gladly quoted them.. I think I am brave enough to do that.. Thank you very much.

BamaGrits84
03-16-2011, 10:01 PM
I know I'm being petty but I think typo's in a quote about education are just a little funny. :Whistle:


I'll be sure to let Fox News know their editing staff is petty. :wink:

Chuck
03-16-2011, 10:01 PM
If anyone would have said that I would have gladly quoted them.. I think I am brave enough to do that.. Thank you very much.

You're welcome very much.

Well I guess I just don't understand your comment then. :huh:

Are you implying that if the school doesn't take these precautions that it/society would be throwing the child away?

Chuck
03-16-2011, 10:03 PM
I'll be sure to let Fox News know their editing staff is petty. :wink:

No silly!!! I'm petty, I just found the typo funny! :D

It wasn't a reflection on you.. It just quoted you because you posted the article. :)

rearnakedchoke
03-16-2011, 10:05 PM
my kids don't even like peanut butter as they have never been allowed to bring it to school .. some kids last year was allergic to strawberries or something and we couldn't send those either .. i have no problem whatsoever with it though .. if it were my child, i'd hope everyone else would be as accommodating as most parents are ...

BamaGrits84
03-16-2011, 10:22 PM
my kids don't even like peanut butter as they have never been allowed to bring it to school .. some kids last year was allergic to strawberries or something and we couldn't send those either .. i have no problem whatsoever with it though .. if it were my child, i'd hope everyone else would be as accommodating as most parents are ...

I think if it ended with kids being asked not to bring certain foods that would be better accepted then kids having to rinse their mouths out before they could enter a classroom. But this goes way beyond "please no pb&j for lunch". if I were the paretn (just notice this typo but leaving it just for chuck) of a child with this type of problem I would realize there is a point when I need to accept my child's problems is causing an unfair enviroment for other children and seek other options for schooling.

Tyburn
03-16-2011, 10:36 PM
but a mask and gloves would protect her the same it seems.

Maybe...maybe not...Sounds like she'd be allergic to the penut dust which gets in the air...microscopic particals that could kill

I dont think she should be in public education period...to dangerous for her

DonnaMaria
03-16-2011, 11:32 PM
Wow………the accommodations do seem a bit excessive……..

I have had students with severe peanut allergies in the past…….even one who would develop a severe, life threatening reaction from just the peanut residue left on tables and doorknobs and such. We had to have an Epipen on hand at all times and everyone involved with this child received instruction on how to administer it.

The parents were also very understanding and while we eliminated peanut foods in our classroom the parents didn't demand that they be eliminated from the school. This child is now in 3rd grade and has had a healthy and happy experience in school. WITH the Epipen close by.

I feel for the child in the article but it seems that her needs are significant and perhaps she should be educated at home for her own safety. Kids bring in all kinds of things from home. It would be difficult to monitor every backpack and lunchbox.

NateR
03-16-2011, 11:40 PM
I think it's a little excessive to force every other student to adapt to this one girl's allergy. Is she going to get that same treatment in college or in the work force? These kinds of extreme precautions are actually harming this girl more in the long run. She might be comfortable now, at the expense of every other kid in her school, but she's not being prepared at all for her life after public school. This is when she needs to learn to adapt to the world, the world doesn't need to completely rewrite itself for her.

flo
03-17-2011, 12:18 AM
I'll be sure to let Fox News know their editing staff is petty. :wink:
Whoever does their news ticker often makes hilarious mistakes. Sometimes that's more entertaining than the actual show. :)

rockdawg21
03-17-2011, 04:54 AM
I think it's a little excessive to force every other student to adapt to this one girl's allergy. Is she going to get that same treatment in college or in the work force? These kinds of extreme precautions are actually harming this girl more in the long run. She might be comfortable now, at the expense of every other kid in her school, but she's not being prepared at all for her life after public school. This is when she needs to learn to adapt to the world, the world doesn't need to completely rewrite itself for her.
+1

Bonnie
03-17-2011, 07:06 AM
Well, I think it's going to be easiest to say who I don't agree with here...Foxy and RNC (sorry! :wink:). I really feel for this child and how everything in her life, unfortunately, has to revolve around this life-threatening peanut allergy; however, I agree with most everyone here that this school has just gone way beyond in expecting everyone in this school to conform to this one child's unfortunate situation. What about visitors to the school...parents, service people, etc... I just think this is very unrealistic, and like someone mentioned, even with all these precautions, there is no way to totally ensure that someone or something won't have some peanut residue on them/it.

SW and Mike both brought up a very valid and real concern...that someone might purposely bring a peanut substance to school. I know it's awful to think that, but some children (and some adults sad to say) might resent this situation (and therefore the child) enough to deliberately harm her and force her to leave. :cry:

As much as I'd want my child to have as normal a life as possible, I just wouldn't take this type of risk with her life when it's not necessary, and I wouldn't expect or force a whole school to go through this type of routine on a daily basis when there are other options for her schooling.

Also, I feel like this type of "disability" cannot be compared to someone in a wheel chair and having to provide ramps and such.

flo
03-17-2011, 07:26 AM
Well said, Bonnie.

County Mike
03-17-2011, 11:56 AM
Hey watch it buster!! :punch: :laugh:

As a parent of 4 home educated children I happen to think that's a great first choice not a last resort. Nothing unfortunate about choosing home education brother. It's a great choice for some (not all) families. :D

I wasn't knocking home school. Just the idea that she won't get to experience school with other kids, if that's what she wants. Also, that it might not be convenient for her parents if both work full time jobs, etc. I think home school is fine if the parents are qualified and able to do so. Many are not.

Tyburn
03-17-2011, 01:25 PM
This is when she needs to learn to adapt to the world.

you dont Adapt with an allergy Nathan. Thats why you avoid it. :rolleyes: The body isnt capable of adapting to comprimise what is actually an immune response in the first place.

Spiritwalker
03-17-2011, 01:36 PM
you dont Adapt with an allergy Nathan. Thats why you avoid it. :rolleyes: The body isnt capable of adapting to comprimise what is actually an immune response in the first place.

What do you think immunotherapy is?

Spiritwalker
03-17-2011, 01:38 PM
As much as I'd want my child to have as normal a life as possible, I just wouldn't take this type of risk with her life when it's not necessary, and I wouldn't expect or force a whole school to go through this type of routine on a daily basis when there are other options for her schooling.

Speaking as a parent... :applause:



Also, I feel like this type of "disability" cannot be compared to someone in a wheel chair and having to provide ramps and such.

Even BIGGER :applause:

NateR
03-17-2011, 02:00 PM
you dont Adapt with an allergy Nathan. Thats why you avoid it. :rolleyes: The body isnt capable of adapting to comprimise what is actually an immune response in the first place.

She needs to adapt to life in a world that not going to give a crap about her peanut allergy when she's an adult. The sooner she learns to do that the better.

Tyburn
03-17-2011, 02:01 PM
What do you think immunotherapy is?

You CANT treat a penut allergy, you can simply be given a drug to try and lessen the responce ONCE ITS STARTED HAPPENING!

I have a peanut allergy myself, thankfully not a serious one :) I mean the diagnosis did require an ambulance...but usually I dont think that would be needed, though one would probably be called just in case :laugh:

NateR
03-17-2011, 02:03 PM
You CANT treat a penut allergy....

...yet.

rearnakedchoke
03-17-2011, 02:09 PM
I think if it ended with kids being asked not to bring certain foods that would be better accepted then kids having to rinse their mouths out before they could enter a classroom. But this goes way beyond "please no pb&j for lunch". if I were the paretn (just notice this typo but leaving it just for chuck) of a child with this type of problem I would realize there is a point when I need to accept my child's problems is causing an unfair enviroment for other children and seek other options for schooling.

yeah .. i wouldn't have a problem with it ... i actually think it'd be better for them in keeping things clean .. who knows, i have always been very accommodating ... i don't see it as an issue ... i think it is good for the children who don't have the allergy to teach them awareness of others and good for the child who has the allergy who can socialize with other students ...

Dethbob
03-17-2011, 02:09 PM
You CANT treat a penut allergy...

YOU can’t, because you have free health care!:laugh:

Spiritwalker
03-17-2011, 02:11 PM
You CANT treat a penut allergy, you can simply be given a drug to try and lessen the responce ONCE ITS STARTED HAPPENING!



well it's kind of hard to treat for an allergy that you don't know that you have.

As far as peanuts go.. no, there is no "cure" as yet, but for many allergies.. there is immunotherapy. And it helps a HUGE amount.

rearnakedchoke
03-17-2011, 02:11 PM
you dont Adapt with an allergy Nathan. Thats why you avoid it. :rolleyes: The body isnt capable of adapting to comprimise what is actually an immune response in the first place.

most kids from what i know do adapt and get over the allergy when they grow up .. yes, some people carry it for a while, but it lessens most of the time and adults are better aware of how to treat a reaction (epi-pen etc) ..

Spiritwalker
03-17-2011, 02:12 PM
YOU can’t, because you have free health care!:laugh:

So Canada has a cure for peanut allergies? I know two people that would be willing to pay for it..

The Mayo Clinic.. maybe you have heard of them... still provides no "cure".

rearnakedchoke
03-17-2011, 02:13 PM
So Canada has a cure for peanut allergies? I know two people that would be willing to pay for it..

The Mayo Clinic.. maybe you have heard of them... still provides no "cure".

we do but we are not sharing ..

Spiritwalker
03-17-2011, 02:24 PM
we do but we are not sharing ..

If that's the case.. we will send our Girl Scouts up there to invade... they will be backed up with 3 battalions of Cub Scouts.. with Eagle Scouts providing covering fire.. should take about three days to accomplish the invasion.. See ya soon.

Chuck
03-17-2011, 02:59 PM
I wasn't knocking home school. Just the idea that she won't get to experience school with other kids, if that's what she wants. Also, that it might not be convenient for her parents if both work full time jobs, etc. I think home school is fine if the parents are qualified and able to do so. Many are not.

I know you weren't knocking it brother. I was just having a little fun with you. That's why I put the smile face thingymabobber in there. :)