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County Mike
12-24-2009, 10:48 AM
I'm currently going through the process. In NJ you need a firearms license to buy or even own a gun. Once you have the license, you need a new purchasing permit every time you want to buy a handgun. Each of these permits comes with a wait.

What I've had to do so far:

I found some info online, along with the required forms. I printed them out and filled them in.
I called the local state police barracks to ask about coming in for processing and was told that only one officer handles that and I'd have to come in when he was working.

I had to wait a few days for a time he would be there that worked for me. Went to the barracks to find out he was out on a call. They said he'd be back in about 15 minutes so I waited. After about 30 minutes, he showed up.

I handed him my paperwork. He looked at it and told me they were the old forms. He handed me the new forms (which had the exact same questions, just in a different format) and told me to fill them out and bring them back another time. I asked if I could just fill them out there instead of leaving and coming back. He agreed. Not sure why that wasn't the first option.

I filled out the new paperwork and handed it all back to him along with my drivers license. He made a copy of that and told me to have a seat. I also had to pay a $5 processing fee. I waited about 15-20 minutes. He hands me a form with a case number on it and tells me I need to make an appointment in another town for finger printing. The cost is $60.25. I leave.

I go online to make my fingerprinting appointment. Nothing available for two weeks. I make the appointment and use my credit card to pay for the appointment. You can't get the appointment without paying first.

Fingerprinting day comes and I go in, get finger printed and leave.

Now I wait. They say it should take about 30 days but from what I've heard, it usually takes much longer. More like 60 days.

My biggest question is: Why is there only one officer who can accept the forms? All he did was file them, assign a case number to me, and hand me a new form for the finger printing.

TLDR: Getting a firearms license in NJ is a pain in the butt. I think they make it extra difficult and inconvenient on purpose just to persuade people not to bother.

I'll let you know how long it takes to finally get my license.

Chuck
12-24-2009, 11:44 AM
I'm currently going through the process. In NJ you need a firearms license to buy or even own a gun. Once you have the license, you need a new purchasing permit every time you want to buy a handgun. Each of these permits comes with a wait.

What I've had to do so far:

I found some info online, along with the required forms. I printed them out and filled them in.
I called the local state police barracks to ask about coming in for processing and was told that only one officer handles that and I'd have to come in when he was working.

I had to wait a few days for a time he would be there that worked for me. Went to the barracks to find out he was out on a call. They said he'd be back in about 15 minutes so I waited. After about 30 minutes, he showed up.

I handed him my paperwork. He looked at it and told me they were the old forms. He handed me the new forms (which had the exact same questions, just in a different format) and told me to fill them out and bring them back another time. I asked if I could just fill them out there instead of leaving and coming back. He agreed. Not sure why that wasn't the first option.

I filled out the new paperwork and handed it all back to him along with my drivers license. He made a copy of that and told me to have a seat. I also had to pay a $5 processing fee. I waited about 15-20 minutes. He hands me a form with a case number on it and tells me I need to make an appointment in another town for finger printing. The cost is $60.25. I leave.

I go online to make my fingerprinting appointment. Nothing available for two weeks. I make the appointment and use my credit card to pay for the appointment. You can't get the appointment without paying first.

Fingerprinting day comes and I go in, get finger printed and leave.

Now I wait. They say it should take about 30 days but from what I've heard, it usually takes much longer. More like 60 days.

My biggest question is: Why is there only one officer who can accept the forms? All he did was file them, assign a case number to me, and hand me a new form for the finger printing.

TLDR: Getting a firearms license in NJ is a pain in the butt. I think they make it extra difficult and inconvenient on purpose just to persuade people not to bother.

I'll let you know how long it takes to finally get my license.

:scared0015:

Ugh!

Llamafighter
12-24-2009, 11:47 AM
NJ is really tough because of it's being so close to NY. Bloomberg is big on keeping folks from buying guns out of state and bringing them in. They've sent investigators to mom and pop gunshops in NC and SC when they've traced purchase records from guns used in the city.
pain in the ass for sure.

Mac
12-24-2009, 01:58 PM
You hit the nail on the head Mike. They figure if they put up enough hoops for you to jump through , you wont pursue it .

It sucks man ,it really does.

Play The Man
12-24-2009, 06:12 PM
I had a similar experience getting a gun in another Democratic blue-state socialist paradise. I posted this in June in a thread now on page 10 of the "Politics" section:

I used to support gun control but my thinking on the issue has changed as I have gotten older and read up on the issue.

I think waiting periods sound reasonable to most people. I had the same discussion with a friend of mine who is a psychiatrist. He supports waiting periods because he is concerned about suicidal people having a gun. I think that is a justifiable concern. Shortly after we had the discussion, I came across a study that addressed the issue. In brief (if I remember all the details correctly), areas with newly instituted waiting periods did experience a decrease in suicide by firearm; however, there was a concomitant increase in suicides by other methods (hanging, pills, carbon monoxide, etc.) so that the overall suicide rate was unchanged. Essentially, the waiting period did put up a roadblock in front of the suicidal person but it didn't stop them from committing suicide, they just took a bottle of Tylenol or sat in a car in a closed garage or strung up a noose from the ceiling. I don't know of a study looking at waiting periods and crimes of passion, but I suspect that (like you mentioned in your post) a homicidal person would use a knife, run the person down with a car or more than likely buy a gun on the street in less than 10 minutes. I recently read about a homicide in our local paper committed by a drug-dealer who had been released from jail less than three hours before he committed the homicide. He was a felon so he couldn't legally obtain a firearm. Instead, within literally minutes, he bought an AK-47 from another criminal on the street and gunned down another drug dealer. I think a truly homicidal person will not be stopped by a waiting period, it is just too easy to buy a gun from a criminal on the street.

I recently purchased a firearm so I know all about waiting periods. Here is the process I had to go through: First, I took a day-long course on gun safety which included range time (I am ok with that, I would have taken it anyway). After I completed the course I was not given a certificate. The gun shop owner had to go to the courthouse and get a signed affidavit. In order to make it inconvenient for the gunowner, they do not allow the gunshop owner to mail you the affidavit; after waiting for the affidavit to be issued, it requires another trip to the gunshop to pick it up in person. After you purchase the gun, you are not allowed to take it home. Instead, you must take the bill of sale with the serial number to the police department. I happened to buy my gun on a Saturday and discovered to my chagrin that the police department office is not open on the weekend (weekday hours are very limited - the office is only open when most people are at work). The following week I had to go during lunch. Surprise! Everyone else has to go at lunchtime so the line was incredibly long (that and the fact that gun sales have exploded since Obama was elected). The parking for the police department is coin meter - one quarter gives you 10 minutes. I had to give up my place in line to avoid a parking ticket. After waiting for almost an hour in line I had to fill out extensive paperwork including signing a release to my personal physician to give up access to my personal, private medical records. I had to pay a fee and be fingerprinted like a common criminal. The fingerprints were sent to the FBI! The waiting period was 14 days. At the end of the 14 days there is a 5 day-window when you must go back to the police department to pick up your paperwork in person. They will not mail it to you. You are not given a reminder call or postcard. If you forget or have conflicts with your schedule tough luck for you. Your paperwork is thrown away and you must start over from the beginning and pay another fee. When you pick up your paperwork at the police department (again with a long line) you are told that you have 48 hours to go back to the gunshop to take possession of your firearm. If you don't (say for instance you have a job, or a family, or a life with duties and responsibilities that make it difficult to make unexpected outings during work hours) then the paperwork is void and you have to start over. Next, is a trip to the gunshop to pick up the gun. I thought I was finished at this point, but like a cruel joke, the gunshop-owner informed me I had 24 hours to return to the police department to have them inspect the gun and record the serial number (which they already have) or I am in violation of the law. Waiting periods may sound reasonable but from personal experience I can tell you that they are onerous (in my case, 5 trips to the gunshop - I bought the gun on a different day than I picked up the affidavit - and 4 trips to the police department - including the Saturday that they were closed). The government purposely makes it difficult and burdensome to go through the process so few people will do it. Can you imagine if they put up these roadblocks to a person picking up a welfare check? Can you imagine if they put up these roadblocks to a person registering to vote. The civil rights lawyers and their ilk would be rioting in the streets. I was lawfully pursuing my 2nd amendment rights and I felt like I was being treated like a criminal or a trained seal going through hoops.

In my case, it was just inconvenience and aggravation. How about the woman being stalked by a crazy ex-boyfriend? She will die with an active restraining order while she is waiting for her gun license. Civil disorder, such as the LA riots or the lawlessness that followed Hurricane Katrina, pops up without warning and with the change in public safety you may want a gun ASAP and not in weeks. The problem is the law-abiding citizen will be out of luck and the gangs and criminals will have an illegal gun in 10 minutes.

Sorry for the rant

Miss Foxy
12-24-2009, 07:29 PM
Sorry to hear this Mike!! It seems like these retards need to realize duh the criminals carry them illegal so why not make it easier for law obiding citizens to obtain the permit!! :w00t:

County Mike
01-30-2010, 12:33 AM
It's been a little over a month since I applied.

Still waiting.

flo
01-30-2010, 01:22 AM
Wow, what a hassle. I just filled out the on-line forms for concealed weapons permit. I realize that's a little differrent than NJ but it is very straight forward here in WA (for the time being, anyway). It's $55 and you get it at the sheriff's/police dept. To simply purchase a firearm, no fee, one form, 5 day wait.

REMY
01-31-2010, 04:16 AM
heh...when i was stationed in PA last year (2009) i was a resident of IL, it took me all of 30mins to buy my handgun, went to a gun show, found what i wanted, the guy siad "since your active duty Military stationed in PA but a resident of IL i have to make a couple of phone calls" filled out all of the paperwork, paid a $40 fee and that was it!

Since then i moved to NJ went to the local police dept, looked into registering my handgun...they wanted me to switch residency's from IL to NJ...even though if i did that i would lose a ton of benifeits, like i don't pay state tax, if i switched my residency to NJ i would have to pay NJ state tax...pshhh yeah right not gonna happen!

oh well!

Tyburn
02-01-2010, 12:59 AM
I'm currently going through the process. In NJ you need a firearms license to buy or even own a gun. Once you have the license, you need a new purchasing permit every time you want to buy a handgun. Each of these permits comes with a wait.

What I've had to do so far:

I found some info online, along with the required forms. I printed them out and filled them in.
I called the local state police barracks to ask about coming in for processing and was told that only one officer handles that and I'd have to come in when he was working.

I had to wait a few days for a time he would be there that worked for me. Went to the barracks to find out he was out on a call. They said he'd be back in about 15 minutes so I waited. After about 30 minutes, he showed up.

I handed him my paperwork. He looked at it and told me they were the old forms. He handed me the new forms (which had the exact same questions, just in a different format) and told me to fill them out and bring them back another time. I asked if I could just fill them out there instead of leaving and coming back. He agreed. Not sure why that wasn't the first option.

I filled out the new paperwork and handed it all back to him along with my drivers license. He made a copy of that and told me to have a seat. I also had to pay a $5 processing fee. I waited about 15-20 minutes. He hands me a form with a case number on it and tells me I need to make an appointment in another town for finger printing. The cost is $60.25. I leave.

I go online to make my fingerprinting appointment. Nothing available for two weeks. I make the appointment and use my credit card to pay for the appointment. You can't get the appointment without paying first.

Fingerprinting day comes and I go in, get finger printed and leave.

Now I wait. They say it should take about 30 days but from what I've heard, it usually takes much longer. More like 60 days.

My biggest question is: Why is there only one officer who can accept the forms? All he did was file them, assign a case number to me, and hand me a new form for the finger printing.

TLDR: Getting a firearms license in NJ is a pain in the butt. I think they make it extra difficult and inconvenient on purpose just to persuade people not to bother.

I'll let you know how long it takes to finally get my license.

my biggest question...are you in some kind of rush for a firearm :huh:

You guys have absolutely NO idea what beauracrasy is...you think if your kept for more then a few moments, or people dont give you what you want, when you want it, your rights are somehow indellably damaged :laugh:

Do you want to know how long Martin has been waiting for an opporation to get rid of gall stones so big they cant be passed and the organ is effectively rendered useless :huh:

THREE MONTHS AND COUNTING :laugh:

It wont kill you to wait...you know you live in a city where its harder to get firearms...didnt you expect this sort of treatment :huh:

VCURamFan
02-01-2010, 01:00 AM
my biggest question...are you in some kind of rush for a firearm :huh:

You guys have absolutely NO idea what beauracrasy is...you think if your kept for more then a few moments, or people dont give you what you want, when you want it, your rights are somehow indellably damaged :laugh:

Do you want to know how long Martin has been waiting for an opporation to get rid of gall stones so big they cant be passed and the organ is effectively rendered useless :huh:

THREE MONTHS AND COUNTING :laugh:

It wont kill you to wait...you know you live in a city where its harder to get firearms...didnt you expect this sort of treatment :huh:

Yeah, I'd say he is. I mean, Obama's already taken a run at our healthcare system, something not everyone's convinced should have been attacked. Maybe next time he'll choose an easier target...:frantics:

Tyburn
02-01-2010, 01:53 AM
Yeah, I'd say he is. I mean, Obama's already taken a run at our healthcare system, something not everyone's convinced should have been attacked. Maybe next time he'll choose an easier target...:frantics:

:unsure-1: I cant really argue with that logic....Health Care Reform today, Firearm ban tommorow...I can see where your coming from :unsure:

J.B.
02-01-2010, 03:02 AM
Here in AZ you don't need any sort of F.O.I.D. card and you don't have to register with the police or anything. In fact, the only time a background check is required is when you are buying a gun from an actual gun shop or sporting goods store, and they only do the standard FBI check which most times lets you leave with the gun right away. If you do have to wait, it's no more than 3 days, because after 3 days if the FBI does not return contact the store can legally sell the gun to you. Other than that, it is legal to buy and sell guns privately and at gun shows without a background check.

Neezar
02-01-2010, 03:38 AM
Do you want to know how long Martin has been waiting for an opporation to get rid of gall stones so big they cant be passed and the organ is effectively rendered useless :huh:

THREE MONTHS AND COUNTING :laugh:




:scared0011:

That is inhumane!

County Mike
02-01-2010, 09:19 AM
Yes, Tyburn. I'm in a hurry to be allowed to exercise my rights. See the contradiction in that sentence? In America, it's our right to protect ourselves with a firearm. However, politicians are trying to essentially remove the rights by making it incredibly difficult.

If I were so inclined, I could find someone that would sell me a gun without any paperwork at all. Heck, I wouldn't even have to tell him my name as long as I have the cash. Of course, if I then used that gun to protect myself or my family I'd be brought up on charges for illegally posessing a firearm. Imagine this situation: Someone kicks my door in at 2am, waking me up from my sleep. They intend to enter my home unlawfully, rape my wife and kill us both. Then they plan to leave with whatever valuables they can find. Instead, I grab my gun and shoot them dead. Guess what. I'd go to jail because I didn't go through all the proper channels to purchase the gun. Does that seem OK to you?

So yes, I'm in a hurry to have the ability to protect my family without going to jail for it.

And as for Martin and his gall stones: Does that help you understand why Americans aren't in a hurry for healthcare reform? I'd much rather pay for my health insurance and be able to get treatment right away than have to wait until it's too late for FREE treatment.

Twinsmama
02-01-2010, 12:54 PM
In Florida to get a concealed weapons permit you have to take a gun safety course. You also need a hunter/gun safety course if you were born after 1975 and want to get a hunting license, so i already had mine. You must show proof of the course, pass background check, get fingerprinted and pay about $75 (can't remember exactly). i think fingerprinting processing was another $35. You mail all the paperwork listed above into the state and it takes about 90 days to get the license back. Again this is only for a concealed weapons permit so that you can carry it on you.

I'm pretty sure you don't need any special license to own a gun but you do have to pass a background check if you purchase it from a dealer. It also needs to be renewed every 7 years. Which I think just involves another fee possibly another background check.

TENNESSEAN
02-01-2010, 01:25 PM
in tn it’s a simple 20min background check with the TBI.

question i have a lot of guns. what happens if i move to nj, do i have to get a license for the guns i already own?

County Mike
02-01-2010, 02:02 PM
in tn it’s a simple 20min background check with the TBI.

question i have a lot of guns. what happens if i move to nj, do i have to get a license for the guns i already own?

If you move to NJ you'd most likely have to hide all your guns, apply for your firearm purchase ID and THEN (after you get the permit) register all your guns with the state. I don't know if this is the process, it's just my best guess based on the laws I've read about so far.

The hiding part is my way of saying, don't try to register them until you've acquired your firearms owner permit. Of course, if you actually move to NJ you should check with someone who knows the laws for sure.

TENNESSEAN
02-02-2010, 12:56 AM
Note to self: don't move to nj

I carry a hand gun a lot without even having a cc permit. Fact is if your not braking the law most cops just don't care.
I got stopped for speeding. The cop ask me if I had any firearms in the truck. I said yes. He said is it loaded. I said the chamber is empty but the clip is loaded. He said you should really get a cc permit. I said I know its on my short list of things to do. He said slow down and be careful. Didn't even give me a speeding ticket.
Gotta love tennessee:)

County Mike
02-25-2010, 07:22 PM
2 months and still waiting.

:(

Tyburn
02-25-2010, 07:41 PM
:unsure-1: okay...so now you've been waiting about as long as it takes to get a passport...how close are you to the end..because, anything beyond three months would be...beauracratic to say the least 2 months and still waiting.

:(

County Mike
02-25-2010, 07:48 PM
Legally, the state of NJ has 30 days to issue or deny. However, I've heard from just about everyone that they always take longer. My concern is that if I push for them to hurry up, they'll deny instead of issue so I'll wait a little longer.

flo
02-25-2010, 08:28 PM
Legally, the state of NJ has 30 days to issue or deny. However, I've heard from just about everyone that they always take longer. My concern is that if I push for them to hurry up, they'll deny instead of issue so I'll wait a little longer.

That's really bad. I know exactly what you mean, we've been in that position too - you hate to rock the boat (or expect that they would FOLLOW THE LAW!!) because some pencil pusher could really mess with you and you'd probably never get the permit.

Hey, on the bright side, maybe you'll hear something tomorrow :-)

J.B.
02-25-2010, 08:28 PM
That's crazy man, nobody should have to wait that long to arm themselves legally.

Twinsmama
02-25-2010, 08:42 PM
in florida there are still ways to legally carry a gun in your car even with it loaded. such a thing like that there?

can they deny you for any reason they want or just criminal history and stuff like that?

it used to take 30 days here (not sure if it was a law or not) but it has been taking 3 months.

Tyburn
02-25-2010, 09:31 PM
Legally, the state of NJ has 30 days to issue or deny. However, I've heard from just about everyone that they always take longer. My concern is that if I push for them to hurry up, they'll deny instead of issue so I'll wait a little longer.

what you want to do is after three months phone wherever it is and actually ask if they have received your application...make it sound like you fear it might have gotten lost in the post or something...something that will make them remember you...but NOT something that will make it look like a complaint, or that the slowness is their fault. If they claim they have it, you could just ask for a status report on how the application is going...say nothing about wanting the permit, and you need to sound as if your worried they havent got what they need to process the information, rather then that your angry because they are taking all year about it.

Then when you get it...write a letter to your local newspaper about your Rights and how long the Government think its acceptable to keep you waiting in your ability to exercise them...you might want to compare this with the thirty day rule they gave you....but also you might want to ask whether the readers believe that your Government will wait that long to receive your tax...after all, that is something due to them by right...but perhaps they ought be aware that the level of bearacrasy is just becoming foolish and rather then disaudeing criminals, is actually leaving the population vulnerable.

But you wait til your liscence is in your hand before writing that letter :wink:

thats what I would do. I know the local papers print gritty letters, I am considering writing to them about council inefficiency with the snow,...but so many others have done it, its hardly worth it now :laugh:

County Mike
04-21-2010, 11:09 AM
NJ State Trooper called my house last night and left a voicemail to tell me that my Firearm Purchaser ID card is in. I can pick it up when he's on duty (which was last night, or next chance is Sunday night).

I was busy working on something so just planned on going Sunday. Then, the trooper pulled into my driveway to let me know it was ready. Of course, I still have to go to the police barracks to get it, he didn't have it with him. Was nice of him to stop by and let me know though.

I applied for the permit on December 8th, 2009. Finally approved and available for pick up on April 20th, 2010. The thing that still gets me is I can only pick it up when this specific trooper is on duty. Nobody else can check my ID to verify who I am and hand it to me?

Anyway.... I'll get it on Sunday.

flo
04-21-2010, 05:53 PM
Finally!

http://img519.imageshack.us/img519/6742/fireworks2o.jpg

Tyburn
04-21-2010, 06:47 PM
:) Well I'm glad you finally got it. :)

TexasRN
04-21-2010, 06:47 PM
NJ State Trooper called my house last night and left a voicemail to tell me that my Firearm Purchaser ID card is in. I can pick it up when he's on duty (which was last night, or next chance is Sunday night).

I was busy working on something so just planned on going Sunday. Then, the trooper pulled into my driveway to let me know it was ready. Of course, I still have to go to the police barracks to get it, he didn't have it with him. Was nice of him to stop by and let me know though.

I applied for the permit on December 8th, 2009. Finally approved and available for pick up on April 20th, 2010. The thing that still gets me is I can only pick it up when this specific trooper is on duty. Nobody else can check my ID to verify who I am and hand it to me?

Anyway.... I'll get it on Sunday.

He came by your house? That's a tad creepy....maybe he likes you? :unsure::laugh:


~Amy

Tyburn
04-21-2010, 06:49 PM
He came by your house? That's a tad creepy....maybe he likes you? :unsure::laugh:


~Amy

there is no need to say it like noone ever could :mellow:

:laugh:

flo
04-21-2010, 06:50 PM
He came by your house? That's a tad creepy....maybe he likes you? :unsure::laugh:


~Amy

hmmm, I thought it was a bit creepy too.

flo
04-21-2010, 06:52 PM
And why does it have to be that specific trooper? The whole thing is very strange.

But maybe that's what happens in Sopranoland. :wink:

County Mike
04-21-2010, 08:57 PM
He came by your house? That's a tad creepy....maybe he likes you? :unsure::laugh:


~Amy

I hope not. He's a large, black man. Totally not my type. :laugh:

J.B.
04-21-2010, 09:25 PM
NJ State Trooper called my house last night and left a voicemail to tell me that my Firearm Purchaser ID card is in. I can pick it up when he's on duty (which was last night, or next chance is Sunday night).

I was busy working on something so just planned on going Sunday. Then, the trooper pulled into my driveway to let me know it was ready. Of course, I still have to go to the police barracks to get it, he didn't have it with him. Was nice of him to stop by and let me know though.

I applied for the permit on December 8th, 2009. Finally approved and available for pick up on April 20th, 2010. The thing that still gets me is I can only pick it up when this specific trooper is on duty. Nobody else can check my ID to verify who I am and hand it to me?

Anyway.... I'll get it on Sunday.

In my opinion, that is totally unacceptable. You shouldn't have to wait 5 months to buy a gun, that is ridiculous.

Arizona just signed a new law that takes effect in July or August, that allows us to start carrying concealed firearms without a permit.

flo
04-21-2010, 09:45 PM
In my opinion, that is totally unacceptable. You shouldn't have to wait 5 months to buy a gun, that is ridiculous.

Arizona just signed a new law that takes effect in July or August, that allows us to start carrying concealed firearms without a permit.

Good, I'm happy for the citizens of Arizona, JB.

Now let's hope that deters people like the lowlife who murdered Robert Krentz.

Tyburn
04-21-2010, 09:50 PM
I hope not. He's a large, black man. Totally not my type. :laugh:

:ninja: of course not :laugh:

J.B.
04-22-2010, 02:20 AM
Good, I'm happy for the citizens of Arizona, JB.

Now let's hope that deters people like the lowlife who murdered Robert Krentz.

We can only hope Flo :wink:

atomdanger
04-22-2010, 03:54 AM
Washington = No wait or anything on any long gun,
couple day wait on handguns.

no license needed for anything,
do not have to register your guns.

You can even own a silencer in Washington state,
although its illegal to use them (Go figure).

My favorite thing about Washington...

"Washington is a "Stand Your Ground" state, in which there is no duty to retreat in the face of what would be perceived by an ordinary person to be a threat to themselves or others by another person that is likely to cause serious injury or death."

Chuck
04-22-2010, 01:53 PM
Washington = No wait or anything on any long gun,
couple day wait on handguns.

no license needed for anything,
do not have to register your guns.

You can even own a silencer in Washington state,
although its illegal to use them (Go figure).

My favorite thing about Washington...

"Washington is a "Stand Your Ground" state, in which there is no duty to retreat in the face of what would be perceived by an ordinary person to be a threat to themselves or others by another person that is likely to cause serious injury or death."

Just wanted to add a little to your post....

5 day wait on any handguns...
You DO need a license to carry concealed for example..
ALL gun purchases through a dealer ARE registered....
Silencers are legal to own, yes... but very difficult to purchase (legally) and the current laws have many gray areas.....

As far as being a "Stand Your Ground" state.. you are absolutely correct. when I carried in WA (still have my CCP) I always tried to remember the phrase.. "I feared for my life"..... that and a nice .45 can get you out of all sorts of danger. :wink:

Not atomdanger of course... just regular danger... :D

County Mike
04-22-2010, 02:17 PM
Regardless of the laws in NJ, if someone breaks into my house I'll apply the old saying:

"Better to be judged by 11 than carried by 6."

Twinsmama
04-22-2010, 03:11 PM
Regardless of the laws in NJ, if someone breaks into my house I'll apply the old saying:

"Better to be judged by 11 than carried by 6."


I agree! My dad has always carried a pistol and never had a concealed weapons permit. He met all the requirements but just never submitted for it. I finally got him to do it a few months ago. The only thing different now is if he ever has to use it he won't get in trouble for having had it on him!

Play The Man
04-22-2010, 08:45 PM
I found this article about gun registration awhile ago.

http://www.examiner.com/examiner/x-36649-DC-Libertarian-Examiner~y2010m2d17-How-to-buy-and-register-a-handgun-in-the-District-of-Columbia-and-live-to-tell-about-it

How to buy and register a handgun in the District of Columbia: a survival guide
February 17, 4:30 PMDC Libertarian ExaminerKris Hammond

Any District of Columbia resident contemplating a handgun purchase in the near future should consider the advice of the lone gun dealer in the District, Charles Sykes. When asked about the most frequent mistake made by would-be D.C. gun buyers, he said, “They don’t learn about the gun registration process first” before buying a gun.

The D.C. Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) provides residents with the legal requirements and paperwork, but residents must discover through trial and error the most efficient manner of completing the mandatory regulatory checklist. The following step-by-step guide to the D.C. gun registration process will fill some of the gaps.

1. Acquire the D.C. MPD “Firearms Registration General Requirements and Study Guide,” Application for Firearms Registration Certificate, and Statement of Eligibility.

Download the Study Guide located on the D.C. MPD website, and carefully read through all of the requirements to register a firearm. However, the Application for Firearms Registration isn’t downloadable because it’s a triplicate form. Upon request, the Firearms Registration Section (202-727-4275) will mail the Guide, Application, and Statement of Eligibility to the applicant. The forms can also be picked up at 300 Indiana Avenue, NW, Room 2169 (located across from Judiciary Square Metro Station).

Sykes also maintains copies of the Application, but be aware that the Application asks for more than an address, phone number, and responses to potentially incriminating questions. It also requires that the applicant provide all addresses of residence for the last five years (with dates of residence), as well as the applicant’s occupation, employers, and business addresses for the past five years (with dates of employment).

The Statement of Eligibility--wherein applicants are required to affirm under oath whether they have ever been “convicted of a prostitution related offense, being a vagrant, operating a bawdy house, abrogating strikers, or any felony” (Question Eight)--epitomizes D.C. regulatory minutiae. Not only is this mysterious Statement not mentioned in the Study Guide, there is no apparent reference to the Statement anywhere on the MPD website. However, MPD requires applicants to complete the form and have it notarized. MPD does not, however, offer notary services. Fortunately, Sykes will notarize the Statement upon request without any additional fee.


2. Attend the Mandatory Gun Safety Class

It’s a good idea to attend the mandatory five-hour (four hours of classroom instruction and one hour of range instruction) gun safety class early in the process, especially if you are a first-time buyer who is uncertain of what gun she wishes to acquire. Sykes says that the course “gives people a chance to see what firearm they might want and to get advice from the firearm instructor about what gun might work best for them.” Upon completion of the course, the instructor provides the applicant with a signed Firearms Safety Course Compliance form certifying course completion.

D.C. MPD provides a list of certified firearms instructors in the Guide, but, unhelpfully, instructors’ names and phone numbers are the only contact information provided. James Wiggins of Sirius, the instructor recently hired by the author, charges substantially less for the course than some other area gun safety instructors. Although highly-experienced gun owners relocating from Virginia or Texas may struggle to stay awake while watching the instructional videos, novice and intermediate gun owners will find the five-hour class valuable. Wiggins’s class covered not only critical information concerning the legal thicket surrounding the rules of engagement, but also gun operation, shooting technique, and tactical tips for home defense.

3. Buy a Gun

There are no gun stores within the District of Columbia, and Sykes doesn’t sell guns, he only handles the transfer of firearms. Handguns can be purchased on a reputable Internet website or any of the area stores (which usually double as gun ranges) in Virginia or Maryland. Visiting a brick-and-mortar storefront is recommended because the buyer can ask questions of gun experts and test fire handguns on the range.

The author is a regular patron of Sharpshooters in Lorton, Virginia. Sharpshooters offers a solid handgun inventory, including used guns sold on consignment. Instructor Wiggins uses Gilbert Indoor Range for the class venue, and Gilbert also sells a few guns. Realco Guns in District Heights, MD, offers a broad selection of new and used handguns. All three locations feature a gun range and gun rentals. The seller of a firearm will typically charge approximately $25 for the overnight shipment to Sykes, as required by federal law.

Prior to a final purchase decision, verify that the gun may be registered under D.C. law. Check the MPD website, which maintains a list of permitted guns. Thanks to attorney Alan Gura (of District of Columbia v. Heller fame), a broad range of handguns may be registered. In the wake of Heller Supreme Court case recognizing a constitutional right to bear arms, the District banned semiautomatic handguns and then attempted to sharply limit which handguns were allowed. D.C. eventually reversed course due to legal pressure from Gura.

Buyers of semiautomatic pistols take note: It is illegal for D.C. gun owners to possess a magazine that holds more than 10 rounds of ammunition. Many semiautomatics, such as the Beretta 92FS, come standard with a 15-round magazine. Although difficult to find at local stores, a 10-round magazine may be purchased on the internet for $22 + shipping and handling.

All gun owners with children living in the home should also invest in a gun safe. The District imposes criminal liability for the negligent storage of firearms. A gun safe permits the owner to prevent a child from acquiring a firearm while at the same time providing quick access to a firearm in case of emergency. Gun locks may be difficult to operate under stressful circumstances and may not even thwart the will of a determined child.


4. Meet Charles Sykes

After purchasing the handgun, call Sykes at 301-577-1427. After Sykes receives the firearm from the seller, schedule a time to meet with Sykes at his sparsely-furnished office (1213 Good Hope Road S.E.) located a 12-minute walk from the Anacostia Metro Station.

Sykes will run a criminal background check and hand you a federal form to complete. D.C. law requires that applicant and Sykes sign the Firearms Registration Certificate “in the presence of each other.” Remember to ask Sykes to notarize the Statement of Eligibility. After this stage of the process is complete, Sykes will request a transfer fee of $125 cash.

5. Obtain Two Passport-Size Photos

Registration applicants must submit two passport-style photos taken within the 30 days prior to the date the application is filed. If one is traveling on the Green Line from the Anacostia Metro, getting off at the Archives Metro Station will provide easy access to either Penn Camera (840 E Street N.W.) or CVS (435 8th Street N.W.). Although the CVS photos are $4 cheaper than Penn Camera’s $12 fee, during a recent 2 p.m. visit to the 8th Street N.W. CVS location, service was very slow and the product was undesirable. Both stores are located within walking distance of the Firearms Registration Section a few blocks away.

6. File Your Registration Application, Pay the Fees, Get Fingerprinted, and Take the Test

Navigate the metal detector at the entrance to 300 Indiana Avenue, N.W. and head straight back to the Firearms Registration Section. The applicant should submit a completed Application form, notarized Statement of Eligibility, two passport photos, and a completed Firearms Safety Course Compliance form. Thereafter, proceed directly to Room 1140B in the basement, where the cashier will accept cash payment for the application, ballistics test, and fingerprinting/FBI background check fees.

Upon returning to the Firearms Registration Section with a paid receipt, the applicant will be fingerprinted. The multiple-choice test is not difficult as long as the Study Guide is carefully reviewed beforehand (most people incorrectly answer the question about antique firearms). The applicant will also complete a form authorizing MPD to perform a background check.

7. Obtain the Approved Firearms Registration Certificate

Following the 10-day waiting period, the approved registration certificate may be picked up by the applicant or MPD will mail the registration certificate upon request.

8. Visit Charles Sykes Again

Travel to Anacostia again and provide Sykes with the approved registration certificate. Sykes will transfer the firearm to the registered owner.

9. Visit the Firearms Registration Section Again

Newly-registered firearms must be brought to the Firearms Registration Section for a ballistics test. The Guide suggests that this process takes approximately one hour.

10. Take the Handgun Home or to the Shooting Range

D.C. law does not permit the possession of a handgun outside the home unless the individual is traveling to a gun range. Therefore, after the registration process is complete, the handgun must be taken straight home or to a gun range.

Although the District of Columbia government has created the elaborate gun registration process ostensibly to reduce gun violence, Sykes says, “Gun violence isn’t a problem with the people who try to obtain the gun legally.” The registration process adds substantially to the cost of the firearm. If a firearm is purchased for $450, the new owner must thereafter contend with the following expenses:

* $22.50 Virginia sales tax
* $25 shipment fee
* $125 gun class fee (may be more depending on the instructor)
* $125 gun dealer transfer fee
* $12 passport photos
* $13 application fee
* $12 ballistics test fee
* $35 fingerprinting / FBI background check fee

The total fees and taxes are $369.50, nearly doubling the actual cost of a $450 firearm to $819.50.

Meanwhile, the process for obtaining a gun in Virginia involves three steps: (1) walk into a store, (2) pay for the gun while submitting to an instant background check, and (3) walk out of the store with the gun, which may be carried outside of a personal residence. Law-abiding gun owners in the District might well exclaim: “If only it were that easy.”

County Mike
04-23-2010, 12:51 PM
and crime is terrible in DC. Go figure.

J.B.
04-23-2010, 01:15 PM
Not atomdanger of course... just regular danger... :D

"regular danger":laugh:

Tyburn
04-23-2010, 05:33 PM
and crime is terrible in DC. Go figure.

I didnt think the city was particularly dangerous, not even at night...I was out in Washington DC Twice in the pitch of night....and once in Chicago, but please DONT tell Michelle because she told me it was too dangerous for me to be wandering "the mean streets" after dark when she phoned and I didnt answer :ashamed:

but you can see from my videos that crime in the cities of America didnt deter me :punch:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6ZuDxkyEl4 (Washington)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CSiztj50IY (Chicago)

:w00t:

VCURamFan
04-23-2010, 05:39 PM
I didnt think the city was particularly dangerous, not even at night...I was out in Washington DC Twice in the pitch of night....and once in Chicago, but please DONT tell Michelle because she told me it was too dangerous for me to be wandering "the mean streets" after dark when she phoned and I didnt answer :ashamed:

but you can see from my videos that crime in the cities of America didnt deter me :punch:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6ZuDxkyEl4 (Washington)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CSiztj50IY (Chicago)

:w00t:
DC & Chicago have two of the highest crime rates in the nation. Ironically, as has been pointed out, they also have some of the stiffest gun laws.

Tyburn
04-23-2010, 05:49 PM
DC & Chicago have two of the highest crime rates in the nation. Ironically, as has been pointed out, they also have some of the stiffest gun laws.

They didnt feel Dangerous to me....but then I have lived in some very dangerous cities...and crime levels...well we probably have a worse crime rate then the United States I would have said...if you minus the death by shooting (it doesnt stop us killing each other by other means, so I'm reluctant to say murder (do you guys call it homecide :ninja::huh:))

We have some of the stiffest gun control laws in the world.

Bradford was the worst. You simply didnt go some places after dark period...and the danger...apart from being attacked or theaft, would have included pouring petrol through your letterbox in the middle of the night and then striking a match...whole families have died in Bradford in house fires started by arson in that manner.

London...you know to me felt relatively safe, mainly because everything shut down at Midnight in terms of tube trains...after that if you were out and about then it was dangerous, nightbusses that would take you on wild goose chases...and when I was in London they had a spate of whats known as "happy slapping" which was basically gangs that would, find the nearest homosexual (or old person, or woman if she was alone), beat him to death, and film it on your mobile phone, to post as anon as possible online....it was happening in central London. I lived near waterloo station where outside one occured. I lived closer to waterloo, then the Washington Memorial is to the Congress Building (probably about a quarter of the National Mall in distance) that was frightening, because they followed him from a pub in Soho, Ironic, as he had been a bar manager who was one of the lucky survivors of a spate of nail bomb attacks in gay pubs during the 1990s.

atomdanger
04-26-2010, 03:09 AM
Just wanted to add a little to your post....

5 day wait on any handguns...
You DO need a license to carry concealed for example..
ALL gun purchases through a dealer ARE registered....
Silencers are legal to own, yes... but very difficult to purchase (legally) and the current laws have many gray areas.....

As far as being a "Stand Your Ground" state.. you are absolutely correct. when I carried in WA (still have my CCP) I always tried to remember the phrase.. "I feared for my life"..... that and a nice .45 can get you out of all sorts of danger. :wink:

Not atomdanger of course... just regular danger... :D

License to carry concealed, not a license to own.
and not a license to carry.

Silencers can be bought with no wait at any gun store,
I just looked at some at a shop Lake City (Seattle) for a .45
So I don't know how you meant tough you buy legally?

but yeah, scared for my life lol.
I heard Oregon you can't even shoot to kill in your own home????

County Mike
04-26-2010, 11:09 AM
Picked up my card last night.

Now, here's the part you'll really love.
With this card, I can go into a gun store and buy a "long gun". Basically a rifle or shotgun. However, if I want to buy a handgun I have to fill another application, write my purchaser ID number on the app, and submit it to the state police. Then, they take however much time it takes to approve it. Once approved, I have 90 days to go and purchase ONE handgun. After 90 days, it expires. You can only get one handgun purchase permit at a time so if you wanted to buy two, you're out of luck.

J.B.
04-26-2010, 11:13 AM
Picked up my card last night.

Now, here's the part you'll really love.
With this card, I can go into a gun store and buy a "long gun". Basically a rifle or shotgun. However, if I want to buy a handgun I have to fill another application, write my purchaser ID number on the app, and submit it to the state police. Then, they take however much time it takes to approve it. Once approved, I have 90 days to go and purchase ONE handgun. After 90 days, it expires. You can only get one handgun purchase permit at a time so if you wanted to buy two, you're out of luck.

God, I'm glad I live in Arizona....:laugh: