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Play The Man
08-06-2009, 09:50 AM
The Scenario:
You are moving to an isolated island with your family. You will not have a chance to have new books delivered for many years; perhaps, never. You will not have access to any media, so reading will be your only diversion. You have enough room for 10 Christian books to take on your journey. These books may need to last your lifetime. Which books would you choose? The only criterion is that the books must be, in some way, Christian. You can choose fiction, poetry, reference, dictionary, devotional, prayer book, biography, systematic theology, etc. but it must. in some way, be Christian. You can choose books that you haven't read as of yet, but might be interested in, based upon a recommendation or review. Remember, your spouse and child will need to share the books, so consider their reading needs, as well (if you are single, use your imagination). One of your books must be a Bible - please specify the version that you would bring. You can count multi-volume books as one choice - for example, The Chronicle of Narnia would count as one book rather than seven. Similarly, a commentary that takes up several volumes could be counted as one book. As an added question, if space were limited, which one of the ten books would you leave behind? If there was a fire, and you could only rescue one book (besides the Bible) which one would you rescue? Please feel free to explain your choices.

Jonlion
08-06-2009, 01:22 PM
Well i am just reading, "the Case for Christ" by Lee Strobel.

I do not require the evidence to enhance my faith but its a fascinating read and informative in that scholars of the highest renown account for the new testament and its authenticity.

Its a compelling read and great for me to use as an extra arguements against sceptics and critics.

VCURamFan
08-06-2009, 02:26 PM
Well I'm not sure about 10, but off the top of my head I can come up with 7:

ESV Bible
John Calvin's Commentary & Institutes
Charles Spurgeon Morning & Evening
Chronicles of Narnia
Trinity Hymnal
Disciplines of a Godly Man
Screwtape LettersCouple of explanations: ESV does a nice job of being easy to read but without compromising content/accuracy. Between Calvin & Spurgeon, I feel like I'd pretty well have my "private worhsip" & "sermons" taken care of. Narnia & Screwtape are fun reads, but also packed with creamy theological goodness. Disciplines is a book I've been needing/meaning to read for awhile now. I picked the Trinity because I love the hymns & also because the edition at church includes the Westminster Confessions & Shorter Catechism.

Anybody got any suggestions for my last 3?

Rev
08-06-2009, 04:45 PM
Well i am just reading, "the Case for Christ" by Lee Strobel.

I do not require the evidence to enhance my faith but its a fascinating read and informative in that scholars of the highest renown account for the new testament and its authenticity.

Its a compelling read and great for me to use as an extra arguements against sceptics and critics.
Strobel is awesome! I have 4 of his books.

1. NASB study bible
2. New American Comentary
i love christian fiction so:
3. Black - Ted Dekker
4. Red - Ted Dekker
5. White - Ted Dekker
6. Blessed Child - Ted Dekker
7. A Man Called Blessed - Ted Dekker
8. Charles Spurgeon Morning & Evening
9. The Cost Of Descipleship - Dietrich Von Bonhoeffer
10. A look at Life From A Deer Stand - Steve Chapman

Chris F
08-06-2009, 05:28 PM
1. Full Life Study Bible (NASB/Greek parallel)
2. The Truth War John MacArthur it was hard to choose between this and "Experiencing God" by Henry Blackaby
3. Beyond Opinion Ravi Zacharis
4. Three Kings Gene Edwards
5. School of Biblical Evangelism By Ray Comfort
6. The Story of Christianity Justo Gonzalez
7. The Complete Biblical Library By: GPH publishing and Various contributors
8. Faded Glory: the Church in a Cultural Crisis by H. Maurice Lednickey
9.Peace be still: Words of encouragements for the storms in your life by: Chris Fluharty
10. Fast Food Faith: A call to discernment in America's Church Today By: Chris Fluharty

All great books. It would be hard to only take 10. I know the last 2 are really self promoting but I would not have written them if I did not want to read them myself.

I would leave the The Truth war for lack of space. It is good but the book I have read it the least of these

In case of fire I would save The complete Biblical Library. It is out of print and a small fortune to replace.

Play The Man
08-06-2009, 06:46 PM
Well I'm not sure about 10, but off the top of my head I can come up with 7:

ESV Bible
John Calvin's Commentary & Institutes
Charles Spurgeon Morning & Evening
Chronicles of Narnia
Trinity Hymnal
Disciplines of a Godly Man
Screwtape LettersCouple of explanations: ESV does a nice job of being easy to read but without compromising content/accuracy. Between Calvin & Spurgeon, I feel like I'd pretty well have my "private worhsip" & "sermons" taken care of. Narnia & Screwtape are fun reads, but also packed with creamy theological goodness. Disciplines is a book I've been needing/meaning to read for awhile now. I picked the Trinity because I love the hymns & also because the edition at church includes the Westminster Confessions & Shorter Catechism.

Anybody got any suggestions for my last 3?

As the originator of this thread, I am going to have to be a jerk and take away your Calvin's Commentaries. I know I said you could count multi-volumes as one book, but 22 volumes is pushing it! I would suggest that you upgrade the ESV Bible to the ESV Study Bible. I got one last week and it is incredible. For your remaining three books, how about Luther's The Bondage of the Will: Written In Answer To The Diatribe Of Erasmus On Free-Will, Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress (From This World To That Which Is To Come), and The Valley Of Vision: A Collection Of Puritan Prayers & Devotions?

Play The Man
08-06-2009, 06:52 PM
Strobel is awesome! I have 4 of his books.

1. NASB study bible
2. New American Comentary
i love christian fiction so:
3. Black - Ted Dekker
4. Red - Ted Dekker
5. White - Ted Dekker
6. Blessed Child - Ted Dekker
7. A Man Called Blessed - Ted Dekker
8. Charles Spurgeon Morning & Evening
9. The Cost Of Descipleship - Dietrich Von Bonhoeffer
10. A look at Life From A Deer Stand - Steve Chapman

If you could find Red, White and Black in a single volume, you could choose two more books. What would you choose?

VCURamFan
08-06-2009, 07:01 PM
As the originator of this thread, I am going to have to be a jerk and take away your Calvin's Commentaries. I know I said you could count multi-volumes as one book, but 22 volumes is pushing it! I would suggest that you upgrade the ESV Bible to the ESV Study Bible. I got one last week and it is incredible. For your remaining three books, how about Luther's The Bondage of the Will: Written In Answer To The Diatribe Of Erasmus On Free-Will, Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress (From This World To That Which Is To Come), and The Valley Of Vision: A Collection Of Puritan Prayers & Devotions?NOOOOOOOOO!!!!! I want my commentaries and institutes!!:punch:

Fine, I'll make a compromise: I'll take the PDF version of the Calvin's works, how about that? Then it's not a ton of extra space in my luggage.

Play The Man
08-06-2009, 07:04 PM
Anybody got any suggestions for my last 3?

I have another three: Augustine's City Of God, Anselm's Cur Deus Homo or Why God Was Made Man, and The Weight of Glory by C.S. Lewis.

Play The Man
08-06-2009, 07:06 PM
NOOOOOOOOO!!!!! I want my commentaries and institutes!!:punch:

Fine, I'll make a compromise: I'll take the PDF version of the Calvin's works, how about that? Then it's not a ton of extra space in my luggage.

Sorry, this is a very remote island and you will not have a computer. If you choose a commentary, you have to choose only one book of the Bible, like Romans. The two volume Institutes can count as one book.

Play The Man
08-06-2009, 07:20 PM
1. Full Life Study Bible (NASB/Greek parallel)
2. The Truth War John MacArthur it was hard to choose between this and "Experiencing God" by Henry Blackaby
3. Beyond Opinion Ravi Zacharis
4. Three Kings Gene Edwards
5. School of Biblical Evangelism By Ray Comfort
6. The Story of Christianity Justo Gonzalez
7. The Complete Biblical Library By: GPH publishing and Various contributors
8. Faded Glory: the Church in a Cultural Crisis by H. Maurice Lednickey
9.Peace be still: Words of encouragements for the storms in your life by: Chris Fluharty
10. Fast Food Faith: A call to discernment in America's Church Today By: Chris Fluharty

All great books. It would be hard to only take 10. I know the last 2 are really self promoting but I would not have written them if I did not want to read them myself.

I would leave the The Truth war for lack of space. It is good but the book I have read it the least of these

In case of fire I would save The complete Biblical Library. It is out of print and a small fortune to replace.

Since you have a photographic memory (wink, wink) you can take a pen and paper and reproduce, from memory, #9 and #10, in your free time. You now have space for two more books. What would you choose?

Chris F
08-06-2009, 07:55 PM
Since you have a photographic memory (wink, wink) you can take a pen and paper and reproduce, from memory, #9 and #10, in your free time. You now have space for two more books. What would you choose?

Experecing God by Henery Blackaby

The complete works of AW Tozer (yes they have it in a single volume)

warriorlion
08-06-2009, 09:39 PM
As the originator of this thread, I am going to have to be a jerk and take away your Calvin's Commentaries. I know I said you could count multi-volumes as one book, but 22 volumes is pushing it! I would suggest that you upgrade the ESV Bible to the ESV Study Bible. I got one last week and it is incredible. For your remaining three books, how about Luther's The Bondage of the Will: Written In Answer To The Diatribe Of Erasmus On Free-Will, Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress (From This World To That Which Is To Come), and The Valley Of Vision: A Collection Of Puritan Prayers & Devotions?

and yet you let him get away with the cronicles, which is what 7 books

Chris F
08-06-2009, 09:47 PM
and yet you let him get away with the cronicles, which is what 7 books
Yeah but Calvin's commentaries and the Institutes are thousand upon thousand of pages. I have them and they take up 3 1/2 shelves on my bookcase. The Narnia series takes less then 7 inches. He should just take the Concise versions which are three book and they are summarized.

Play The Man
08-06-2009, 09:51 PM
and yet you let him get away with the cronicles, which is what 7 books

I'm making it up as I go along. The Narnia books are relatively short and there are editions that include all 7 stories in one big volume. Calvin's Commentaries are 22 volumes and would fill a trunk. It is just an exercise in imagination as a way to determine your favorite books. With technology as it is, you could fit a small library on a Kindle, or if you had a computer or cell phone with internet access you could have access to the entire contents of the Christian Classics Ethereal Libraryhttp://www.ccel.org/index/en.html

NateR
08-07-2009, 04:31 AM
This is a tough call, but here's my list:


NKJV Bible
Complete Jewish Bible
Hebrew Tanakh
Jewish New Testament Commentary by David H. Stern
The Science of God by Gerald Schroeder
Genesis and the Big Bang by Gerald Schroeder
Strong's Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible
The Wisdom in the Hebrew Alphabet by Rabbi Michael L. Munk
New Inductive Study Bible (NASB)
Zondervan Handbook to the Bible


I'm just using books that I own now and wouldn't want to lose. Also, 4 of my choices wouldn't technically be considered Christian, since they are about the Jewish faith.

adamt
08-07-2009, 04:51 AM
This is a tough call, but here's my list:


NKJV Bible
Complete Jewish Bible
Hebrew Tanakh
Jewish New Testament Commentary by David H. Stern
The Science of God by Gerald Schroeder
Genesis and the Big Bang by Gerald Schroeder
Strong's Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible
The Wisdom in the Hebrew Alphabet by Rabbi Michael L. Munk
New Inductive Study Bible (NASB)
Zondervan Handbook to the Bible


I'm just using books that I own now and wouldn't want to lose. Also, 4 of my choices wouldn't technically be considered Christian, since they are about the Jewish faith.


what's the basis of your interest in the jewish faith? I find it interesting that you find it interesting. Do you speak/write hebrew?

Play The Man
08-07-2009, 05:25 AM
Also, 4 of my choices wouldn't technically be considered Christian, since they are about the Jewish faith.

If they help better interpret the Old Testament in its original language then it should be acceptable as a reference book. Something like Josephus isn't "Christian" but it is essential to help understand intertestamental and New Testament history.

NateR
08-07-2009, 05:31 AM
what's the basis of your interest in the jewish faith? I find it interesting that you find it interesting. Do you speak/write hebrew?

Well, several factors:

1. My dad is Jewish, his family fled Germany in the 1930s and tried to go to the US, but were turned back at Ellis Island. Some of them settled in Mexico (where my dad was born), but most of them ended up back in Germany to be exterminated in Auschwitz.

2. Judaism is the basis for the Christian faith. A lot of what we follow today is sort of a "Romanized" version of Christianity; but the original "Christians" were Jews. Prior to 70 AD, "Christianity" was considered just another sect of Judaism.

3. With the exception of Luke, every single author of the Bible was Jewish. So, in order to fully understand what the Bible is telling us, we need to understand the minds of the Jewish authors. That requires us to go back and understand the language these men spoke and the Jewish culture these men were raised in. It will also help you to understand Jesus, because He was not some revolutionary, proto-hippie that we see portrayed in pop culture, He was a Jewish Rabbi.

4. Finally, Hebrew is an amazing language with 4 different levels of meaning. When you translate a Jewish word into English, you actually lose 3 of those 4 levels. So you will never truly gain a full understanding of the Bible unless you study the Hebrew language.

I don't speak or read Hebrew. I tried teaching myself a few years back, but fell behind when it came time for college finals. I've never really picked it back up again, but I need to.

Maybe I should add a "Teach Yourself Biblical Hebrew" book to my list. Either that or just drag a Rabbi with me to my desert island. :laugh:

Play The Man
08-07-2009, 05:42 AM
I don't speak or read Hebrew. I tried teaching myself a few years back, but fell behind when it came time for college finals. I've never really picked it back up again, but I need to.

Maybe I should add a "Teach Yourself Biblical Hebrew" book to my list. Either that or just drag a Rabbi with me to my desert island. :laugh:

I don't know if this website is any good but somehow I bookmarked it a long time ago and forgot about it until I read your post:http://www.ancient-hebrew.org/index.html

NateR
08-07-2009, 05:52 AM
I don't know if this website is any good but somehow I bookmarked it a long time ago and forgot about it until I read your post:http://www.ancient-hebrew.org/index.html

Awesome! I bookmarked it and I'll read through it later on. Right now it's past my bedtime. Thanks!:cool:

Play The Man
08-07-2009, 06:09 AM
Awesome! I bookmarked it and I'll read through it later on. Right now it's past my bedtime. Thanks!:cool:

You're welcome. I hope it is a useful website for you.

adamt
08-07-2009, 01:12 PM
Well, several factors:

1. My dad is Jewish, his family fled Germany in the 1930s and tried to go to the US, but were turned back at Ellis Island. Some of them settled in Mexico (where my dad was born), but most of them ended up back in Germany to be exterminated in Auschwitz.

2. Judaism is the basis for the Christian faith. A lot of what we follow today is sort of a "Romanized" version of Christianity; but the original "Christians" were Jews. Prior to 70 AD, "Christianity" was considered just another sect of Judaism. i totally agree on this, and really wish more people knew and thought this way
3. With the exception of Luke, every single author of the Bible was Jewish. So, in order to fully understand what the Bible is telling us, we need to understand the minds of the Jewish authors. That requires us to go back and understand the language these men spoke and the Jewish culture these men were raised in. It will also help you to understand Jesus, because He was not some revolutionary, proto-hippie that we see portrayed in pop culture, He was a Jewish Rabbi.I also believe there is a significant difference between the jews of abrahams time and the jews of moses time compared to Jesus' day and Paul's day
4. Finally, Hebrew is an amazing language with 4 different levels of meaning. When you translate a Jewish word into English, you actually lose 3 of those 4 levels. So you will never truly gain a full understanding of the Bible unless you study the Hebrew language. I knew it was deep but I didn't know qhite that deep

I don't speak or read Hebrew. I tried teaching myself a few years back, but fell behind when it came time for college finals. I've never really picked it back up again, but I need to.

Maybe I should add a "Teach Yourself Biblical Hebrew" book to my list. Either that or just drag a Rabbi with me to my desert island. :laugh:

I don't read too much and I hate basing my beliefs off of someone else's convictions rather than my own. So I would be tempted only to take the bible, then really start learning to pray, meditate on the Word, and fast. I think that is the purest way to grow, through convictions by The Holy Spirit through the Word. Don't get me wrong commentaries are interesting , but I don't use one til I really get stuck on a passage, then i insist on getting several points of view on it.

I guess my point of view is that books give knowledge, time with God gives wisdom.

Having said that, it would be really cool to learn greek, hebrew, and latin. So can I take rosetta stone with me for those three languages? :laugh:



Nate:
I am not a student of history, especially the world wars, which i am a bit ashamed of, but how many jews did america help kill by not giving them refuge. Was being jewish why they got turned away from ellis island? If that was what was going on, then it seems to me we owe jews more than we owe blacks, even though we did fight for their behalf agianst hitler.

adamt
08-07-2009, 01:21 PM
there is a converted jewish man that pastors a large baptist church in the nearby big city, that i attended a little bit, it is quite amazing hearing him recite hebrew in his sermons once in a while.

Rev
08-07-2009, 02:19 PM
If you could find Red, White and Black in a single volume, you could choose two more books. What would you choose?
9. Saint - Ted Dekker
10. My Stong's Concordance

NateR
08-07-2009, 05:46 PM
Nate:
I am not a student of history, especially the world wars, which i am a bit ashamed of, but how many jews did america help kill by not giving them refuge. Was being jewish why they got turned away from ellis island? If that was what was going on, then it seems to me we owe jews more than we owe blacks, even though we did fight for their behalf agianst hitler.

Well, most of it was political, they turned the refugees back to keep from giving the impression that we were taking a side in the war raging in Europe. It was a cowardly move on our nation's part.

There were also a lot of Hitler supporters in America at that time and those who supported Hitler, like Henry Ford, were very vocal about it. Thus, Anti-Semitism was pretty high in America, even after the war. General Patton himself was opposed to the idea of releasing the Jews from the Concentration Camps, because he believed that Jews were "lower than animals" and they would spread across the countryside like rats unless they were kept locked up.

So, yes, America has a lot to answer for because of how we've treated GOD's Chosen People.

adamt
08-07-2009, 05:57 PM
Well, most of it was political, they turned the refugees back to keep from giving the impression that we were taking a side in the war raging in Europe. It was a cowardly move on our nation's part.

There were also a lot of Hitler supporters in America at that time and those who supported Hitler, like Henry Ford, were very vocal about it. Thus, Anti-Semitism was pretty high in America, even after the war. General Patton himself was opposed to the idea of releasing the Jews from the Concentration Camps, because he believed that Jews were "lower than animals" and they would spread across the countryside like rats unless they were kept locked up.

So, yes, America has a lot to answer for because of how we've treated GOD's Chosen People.

What exactly is the root of the animosity towards jews? I don't understand it. It has to be founded some way. I can see the black vs white animosity, i even see how there is animosity between the muslims and whites but I guess I didn't know so much about the anti semitism, especially with patton and ford. I don't mean to say it is justified, just what is there reasoning?

Boomer
08-07-2009, 06:30 PM
Tale of three Kings
Prisoner in the third Cell
Safe people
Search for Significance
Lord of the Rings Trilogy
Making of a champion
NIV Bible
Boundaries
History of the Church
Christian Counseling 3rd addition

NateR
08-07-2009, 10:24 PM
What exactly is the root of the animosity towards jews? I don't understand it. It has to be founded some way. I can see the black vs white animosity, i even see how there is animosity between the muslims and whites but I guess I didn't know so much about the anti semitism, especially with patton and ford. I don't mean to say it is justified, just what is there reasoning?

It goes back almost to the very beginning and, ironically enough, it was the Jews who first started distancing themselves from the Jesus-Followers.

Initially, as described in the book of Acts, the "Christian Church" was strictly Jewish and it was a great source of controversy when Gentiles began to be allowed into the "church."

Until, 70 AD, there was no separate "Christian religion." It was all just another part of Judaism. However, after the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus in 70 AD and the destruction of the Temple, a rift began to grow between the followers of Christ and those who we would eventually begin to refer to as Orthodox Jews. The Jews actually began throwing the Jesus-Followers out of their synagogues, since they blamed this upstart group of believers for the Roman attack.

But you have to understand that the destruction of Jerusalem was a horribly violent and traumatizing ordeal for the Jews at the time. It's said that so many Jews were crucified that the entire great forest of Lebanon was stripped bare of trees, which is why there is no more great forest of Lebanon.

Of course, we understand that this was just more of GOD's judgement being placed on His people for rejecting His Son.

So, the big break was in 70 AD and for centuries Christianity began to develop on its own with no more ties to Jewish culture. In addition, when Constantine converted to Christianity and legalized it in the 4th century (300 years after Christ), many pagan rituals, customs, symbols and holidays were suddenly repackaged with Christian names and the rift between Christianity and it's Jewish origins grew even wider.

Then the Bible began getting translated into different languages like Latin and eventually English and certain words were taken out and replaced with new words. These new words served the (possibly unintentional) purpose of creating an imaginary wall of separation between Jews and Christians:

1. "Church" - the Greek word is actually ekklesia and means "assembly" or "congregation" which simply refers to a group of people congregating in one place. It's the same term used in the Old Testament to refer to the Nation of Israel. So, if you go to the original text, there is no distinction between an Old Testament believer in Christ and a New Testament believer in Christ. Now that might sound odd at first, but that leads to the next word...

2. "Christ" - the Greek word is christos and means "annointed." The same as the Hebrew word mashiach which is transliterated as "messiah." The definitive article "ha" would be added to distinguish The Messiah as The One promised to the nation of Israel, creating the Hebrew word "HaMashiach." So, the correct English name is "Jesus, The Messiah" or "Jesus, The Annointed." But then that's not entirely correct either...

3. "Jesus" - this is another constructed name, Jesus would have gone by the name Yeshua, which is just a 1st century form of the OT name Y'hoshua, or Joshua in modern times. It literally means "GOD saves", so the entire name Yeshua HaMashiach would literally translate as "GOD saves the annointed.":cool:

4. "Jehovah" - another construct, but this time a combination of two words, not just a reinvention of one word. "Jehovah" is actually a merging of the consonants of GOD's name, YHVH, with the Hebrew vowel sounds for "Adonai." Thus, creating a new name for GOD with no historical context. In truth, the vowels sounds for GOD's name have been lost because the Jews never wrote them down, for fear of taking GOD's name in vain. So no one knows how to actually pronounce it anymore. Our pronunciation of "Yahweh" is really just an educated guess and is not entirely correct because the "w" should actually be pronounced more like a "v".

So you can see that a new language of Christianity has been constructed that prevents many modern Jews from even recognizing their own Messiah.

Maglorius
08-11-2009, 05:20 PM
My top ten would be:

1. The Bible - NASB, ESV, NKJV
2. Lord of the Rings
3. Chronicles of Narnia
4. Chosen by God - RC Sproul
5. Knowing God - JI Packard
6. Last Disciple Series - Hank Hannegraaf/Sigmound Brouwer
7. Supremacy of Christ in a Postmodern World
8. Vintage Jesus - Mark Driscoll/Gerry Brashears
9. Porn again Christian - Mark Driscoll
10. The Apocalypse Code - Hank Hannegraaf

Play The Man
08-11-2009, 09:59 PM
During a 1962 interview with Christian Century, C. S. Lewis listed the following as the ten books that influenced him most:


1. George MacDonald, Phantastes

2. G. K. Chesterton, The Everlasting Man

3. Virgil, The Aeneid

4. George Herbert, The Temple

5. William Wordsworth, The Prelude

6. Rudolf Otto, The Idea of the Holy

7. Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy

8. Boswell’s Life of Johnson

9. Charles Williams, Descent into Hell

10. Arthur James Balfour, Theism and Humanism

Mike1983
08-12-2009, 12:32 AM
Wow...loving the John Calvin and Luther works in here! I love reading Martin Luther's works...such an outstanding writer and theologian.

the 10 i would take would be:

ESV study Bible
John Calvin's Institutes
Bondage of the Will by Martin Luther
Desiring God by John Piper
Of Sin and Temptation by John Owen
The Sovereignty of God by A.W. Pink
Vintage Jesus by Mark Driscoll
Radical Reformission by Mark Driscoll
Martin Luther's commentary on Galatians
Systematic Theology by Wayne Grudem