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Tyburn
05-17-2009, 12:10 PM
:huh:

You cant name another human being or pet, dead or alive, and you cant name GOD or any other religious diety.

Excluding the above, what is your most prized material possession and why?

There are several ways you can think of this, what is the object that brings you the most joy, gets used the most often? What is the most valuable thing you own? what holds the most sentimental value to you.


For me, I dont really own anything expensive, I rent my flat, my computer is nearly 10 years old, my television is nearly 20 years old, I dont own a dishwasher, or even a washing machine...so its probably my scaner and printer which was new last year probably costs around 100 ($200) maximum

The thing that brings me most pleasure without a doubt at this season of my life is my computer with internet connection and my little video busbi upgrade thing

The most sentimental thing of worth is a letter from The Lord Bishop of London, who wrote to me after I left Saint Paul's Cathedral to thank me for my two years of sevice to the diocise (Before 2005 it was a little bundle of letters from my Grandmother who began writing to me in 1997 but died in 2001)

VCURamFan
05-17-2009, 02:47 PM
The thing I'm most proud of owning is probably my brand new Bachelor's degree that I just got yesterday.

The most sentimental item I have is a short letter my day gave my about a year ago telling me how proud of me he was/is. I keep it in my wallet.

MattHughesRocks
05-17-2009, 03:31 PM
And you make fun of me??? :blink:

The thing I'm most proud of owning is probably my brand new Bachelor's degree that I just got yesterday.

The most sentimental item I have is a short letter my day gave my about a year ago telling me how proud of me he was/is. I keep it in my wallet.

TexasRN
05-17-2009, 03:37 PM
My most prized material possession is my cell phone. I keep in touch with my family and friends with it. Love, love, love talking and texting with my loved ones.



~Amy

Josh
05-17-2009, 04:16 PM
My Bible followed by my theology books. But I am guessing thats not what you meant Dave so I would have to say my motorcycle. It's a Triumph 675. It's an '07 so two years old now but I really love it.

Tyburn
05-17-2009, 04:22 PM
My Bible followed by my theology books. But I am guessing thats not what you meant Dave so I would have to say my motorcycle. It's a Triumph 675. It's an '07 so two years old now but I really love it.
Bible is a physical book, so thats alright I guess :laugh:

Oddtodd76
05-17-2009, 04:34 PM
my most prized possession would be my guns. Especially now, with so many wanting to rid us of these items.

Spiritwalker
05-17-2009, 04:35 PM
A few few martial arts certificates and belts..

a few pictures ...

My kids birth certificates... those mean the world to me.

And there are two people.. that I would do just about anything for.. hands down, no questions...

NateR
05-17-2009, 05:48 PM
Whenever I am working on a drawing and it is going well, then I become extremely protective over it. If something happens to damage or destroy the picture, it's almost like a death in the family. I can actually slip into a depression for a few days.

Right now I'm working on a drawing of my favorite comic book character, Beast from the X-Men, and I'm so protective of it that I don't even want to show it to anybody yet. So, for right now, it would be my prized possession. If I woke up in the middle of the night with my apartment building on fire, then getting that drawing to safety would be my top priority. I'll most likely even take it with me to Vegas, because I really don't want to be apart from it.

You really have to be an artist to understand, though. I've had drawings ruined in the past and people always say, "Well can't you just draw another one?" It's not that simple. It's almost as insensitive as going up to a parent, attending their child's funeral, and asking them, "Well can't you just have another kid?" It sounds like I'm overstating it, but I'm really not. It's like having a piece of your soul ripped out and you can never get it back. Because no matter how hard you try, you'll never be able to recreate that drawing exactly like it was. It's something that can negatively affect you for days, months, even years.

Of course with every piece of artwork there comes a point where the artist is able to finally release it and if it gets destroyed after that, it would still be a shame, but not nearly as traumatic as if it happened while it was still unfinished.

So, for any parents out there of artistic children, just remember that one of the worst, most traumatic things you could ever do your child would be to rip a piece of artwork out from under them and tear it apart before their eyes. If you disapprove of the subject matter, then let them finish the drawing and get it out of their system. You'll find that they will more than likely be ready to move on of their own accord. If you destroy it in front of them, then that image you are trying to protect them from will be painfully burned into their mind for the rest of their lives.

rearnakedchoke
05-17-2009, 06:09 PM
Whenever I am working on a drawing and it is going well, then I become extremely protective over it. If something happens to damage or destroy the picture, it's almost like a death in the family. I can actually slip into a depression for a few days.

Right now I'm working on a drawing of my favorite comic book character, Beast from the X-Men, and I'm so protective of it that I don't even want to show it to anybody yet. So, for right now, it would be my prized possession. If I woke up in the middle of the night with my apartment building on fire, then getting that drawing to safety would be my top priority. I'll most likely even take it with me to Vegas, because I really don't want to be apart from it.

You really have to be an artist to understand, though. I've had drawings ruined in the past and people always say, "Well can't you just draw another one?" It's not that simple. It's almost as insensitive as going up to a parent, attending their child's funeral, and asking them, "Well can't you just have another kid?" It sounds like I'm overstating it, but I'm really not. It's like having a piece of your soul ripped out and you can never get it back. Because no matter how hard you try, you'll never be able to recreate that drawing exactly like it was. It's something that can negatively affect you for days, months, even years.

Of course with every piece of artwork there comes a point where the artist is able to finally release it and if it gets destroyed after that, it would still be a shame, but not nearly as traumatic as if it happened while it was still unfinished.

So, for any parents out there of artistic children, just remember that one of the worst, most traumatic things you could ever do your child would be to rip a piece of artwork out from under them and tear it apart before their eyes. If you disapprove of the subject matter, then let them finish the drawing and get it out of their system. You'll find that they will more than likely be ready to move on of their own accord. If you destroy it in front of them, then that image you are trying to protect them from will be painfully burned into their mind for the rest of their lives.
Beast? so how did you take it when they cast Side Show Bob as him in the movie? i was dissapointed

Hughes_GOAT
05-17-2009, 06:41 PM
Nate, just put the pencil down, we're not here to hurt you.

NateR
05-17-2009, 06:43 PM
Beast? so how did you take it when they cast Side Show Bob as him in the movie? i was dissapointed

Well, Beast was probably the least objectionable thing about that horrible movie; but I had several problems with how he was depicted:

1. my biggest pet peeve is that he was given blue skin. If you read about his transformation in the comics, his coloration is determined by his fur, not his skin. He originally started out with grey fur (Amazing Adventures #11, 1972), then it was turned to black (Amazing Adventures #15, 1972). However, because of the limited color palette available in those days, the highlights of his fur were colored blue and, over the years, people just assumed that his fur was supposed to be blue from the very beginning.

Underneath all that fur, we're led to believe that Hank has normal colored skin (just extremely pale from lack of exposure to the sun). It's the bluish-black fur that makes him appear the color that he is. Just think of his face like a short-haired dog. The fur is so fine that it doesn't cover up their facial features, but thick enough to completely obscure their skin.

Here's a drawing I did trying to visualize what Beast's face "should" look like close-up with every inch of it covered in a fine fur:
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c201/Barada73/Bouncing_Blue_Beast___color_by_NMRo.jpg

So, giving him blue skin on his face and unnaturally, neon-blue fur really annoyed the crap out of me. I just chalked it up to laziness on the part of the make-up artists.

2. I would have had no problem with Kelsey Grammer voicing an animated version of the character, but the guy is just too average looking to play Beast in a live-action film. We got no sense of Beast having unusually large hands and feet (a key feature of the character). Plus, there was never a hint of any super-strength, super-agility, or extreme athleticism. Beast is supposed to be an acrobat that would put any Olympic gymnast or freak-show contortionist to shame. Kelsey Grammer was just not believable in that role. He looked passable in the promotional shots, but just couldn't pull off the action sequences without obvious wire effects.

3. Finally, Grammer simply played the movie version of the animated Beast from the 1990s cartoon. The reclusive, scientist Beast, who just sits in his lab and never goes out on missions, simply didn't exist in the comics prior to the animated series. In the comic series, Beast was the muscle of the original team and always one of the first heroes leading the charge into battle. In the 1960s, he was depicted as the outspoken, mildly-chauvenistic, grandstander of the X-Men. When he was a member of the Avengers, he was the wisecracking, womanizing, practical-joking, party animal. So the soft-spoken hermit who appeared in the cartoon was a new development for the character; but it seems to be the one that most people are now familiar with.

NateR
05-17-2009, 06:54 PM
Nate, just put the pencil down, we're not here to hurt you.

It's not me I'm worried about, just don't harm the artwork. :laugh:

Hughes_GOAT
05-17-2009, 07:16 PM
It's not me I'm worried about, just don't harm the artwork. :laugh:
:ninja:

J.B.
05-17-2009, 07:23 PM
Mine would have to be my Resonator Guitar. I have wrote and recorded a countless number of songs with it and it's been across the country with me.

http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a360/shockdamonkey/DSC00768.jpg

Black Mamba
05-17-2009, 07:25 PM
Nate, your post was very heart touching and in a way I know how you feel. I had a horrible art teacher in fifth grade who's idea of art was her way or the highway. I always thought art was supposed to be fun, but not with this lady. I'll never forget I was working on this one piece of art and it wasn't up to her standards. She erased more than half of the drawing and ended up making me cry. It was because of her that I decided not to explore art deeper and ended up in the theatre aspects.

As for my most prized possession....well I got a few. :) 1) Ernie my Venus Fly Trap 2) Presidential and Congressional Nominations to the Naval Academy 3) certificate for being one of 1600 people in the US to attend the summer seminar at the Academy 4) Graduating from high school with my honors diploma, honors sash, and SCPA award of distinction 5) my Thespian trophy and SCPA outstanding drama trophy 6) a special action figure I got for Christmas (Chatterer), that's so prized I keep in my undie drawer

And then my upcoming one will be getting my bachelors :cool:

cheachea
05-17-2009, 08:22 PM
I'd have to say my Audio Bible is my most prized possesion. It's cool cuz I can throw in a cd on the way to work and listen to The Word. It makes it alot easier to get through large sections of scripture like Isaiah and Deuteronomy.

NateR
05-17-2009, 08:48 PM
Nate, your post was very heart touching and in a way I know how you feel. I had a horrible art teacher in fifth grade who's idea of art was her way or the highway. I always thought art was supposed to be fun, but not with this lady. I'll never forget I was working on this one piece of art and it wasn't up to her standards. She erased more than half of the drawing and ended up making me cry. It was because of her that I decided not to explore art deeper and ended up in the theatre aspects.


Yeah, art teachers can be a mixed blessing. You just have to remember that there is a reason that they are teaching art and not creating art. What's that old saying? "Those who can't do, teach." :laugh: That's never more true than when it comes to anything artistic or creative.

Also, jealousy is a big problem especially in college art classes. Some teachers are resentful of students who display more natural talent and are better artists than they are. So they tend to be overly critical and discourage those students rather than help teach them. It's a problem my brother has had in every single art class he's attended and I've experienced it once or twice myself too.

Black Mamba
05-17-2009, 09:18 PM
I wish I would of had that saying in mind in her class. There was a reason why she was teaching instead of creating art. I didn't start liking art again until my senior year of high school because I had a teacher who appreciated everyone's work.

I never get why people get jealous of others art work. I get it, but then I don't. I understand in the performing arts world, because that arena is super competitive. I had my fourth grade dance teacher jealous of me because she thought I was "too confident of an actor." :rolleyes: But I would think jealously in the art world would clog the creator's mind and inhibit their imagination.

If you destroy it in front of them, then that image you are trying to protect them from will be painfully burned into their mind for the rest of their lives.

Oh and this is very true. I remember to this day, in full detail what the image was my teacher erased half of. The assignment was to re-create an assigned Diego Rivera drawing.

I was given this because she thought it should have been easy for me.
http://imagecache5.art.com/p/LRG/8/808/11OI000Z/diego-rivera-retrato-de-ignacio-sanchez.jpg

I was very proud of the amount of detail I put in the picture and that I was able to make the face look similar to the drawing. I had a hard time with the feet though. But for reasons I don't remember, (she was talking as she erased it) I just got very emotional. :cry: All heard from her mouth was sounds like Charlie Brown's teacher. I was proud of my work and she didn't like it. Just seeing her using my pencil to erase my work...and then brushing the shavings to ground....a kid doesn't forget that. I was only 11 at the time.

MattHughesRocks
05-17-2009, 09:31 PM
Oh great, now I'm depressed.Thanks NateR! :cry:
Whenever I am working on a drawing and it is going well, then I become extremely protective over it. If something happens to damage or destroy the picture, it's almost like a death in the family. I can actually slip into a depression for a few days.

Right now I'm working on a drawing of my favorite comic book character, Beast from the X-Men, and I'm so protective of it that I don't even want to show it to anybody yet. So, for right now, it would be my prized possession. If I woke up in the middle of the night with my apartment building on fire, then getting that drawing to safety would be my top priority. I'll most likely even take it with me to Vegas, because I really don't want to be apart from it.

You really have to be an artist to understand, though. I've had drawings ruined in the past and people always say, "Well can't you just draw another one?" It's not that simple. It's almost as insensitive as going up to a parent, attending their child's funeral, and asking them, "Well can't you just have another kid?" It sounds like I'm overstating it, but I'm really not. It's like having a piece of your soul ripped out and you can never get it back. Because no matter how hard you try, you'll never be able to recreate that drawing exactly like it was. It's something that can negatively affect you for days, months, even years.

Of course with every piece of artwork there comes a point where the artist is able to finally release it and if it gets destroyed after that, it would still be a shame, but not nearly as traumatic as if it happened while it was still unfinished.

So, for any parents out there of artistic children, just remember that one of the worst, most traumatic things you could ever do your child would be to rip a piece of artwork out from under them and tear it apart before their eyes. If you disapprove of the subject matter, then let them finish the drawing and get it out of their system. You'll find that they will more than likely be ready to move on of their own accord. If you destroy it in front of them, then that image you are trying to protect them from will be painfully burned into their mind for the rest of their lives.

lyndsey823
05-17-2009, 09:36 PM
my most prized possesion is either my iphone which is constantly attached to me. or my 5 original printings of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz books my grandmother got for me a few christmases ago. they are from 1900-1910, and i love them, she searched forever to find them, and i watch over them like a hawk!!!

my most sentimental possesion is my parents' wedding album. i've had it since i was young, they divorced when i was 7. my brother took it from me, but i finally got it back last year! i love that thing!!

mikthehick
05-17-2009, 09:47 PM
My German-made Deutch 1997 violin. I remember that day like yesterday, when my violin teacher, Carol Taylor, my mom, and me went up to Potter's in Bethesda Maryland in 8th grade. With some will money, my mom wanted me to pick out an instrument that I could have for life. Carol helped me, and played it first, and it was love at first sight. I started taking lessons right after I turned 9 (I'm almost 26 now)

That violin has seen weddigs, funerals, joys, sadness, loss, and triumph. I played it in rain, sleet, snow, and sunny days, no joke. I've even played it on street corners in DC, Alexandria, a beach, the Kennedy Center in DC, Charlottesville, and in civil war re-enactments and period plays.

I've also taught kids on it and my viola, and that violin helped me become a nationally ranked player in high school. :cool: I went to regionals, states, and to Disney world to play. Violin was a way of life. The violin resume is about 5 pages compared to my 1 page job resume!

I stopped playing the violin in January of 2008, after the death of my violin teacher due to pancreatic cancer (the same kind Patrick Swayze has).

Like Nate and Lil D have said, its not easy to just pick up and go again. Carol taught me everything I know about the violin, bluegrass, jazz and fiddle. She was always there if I had a last minute audition, and i would drive 2 hrs to Northern VA, take a quick lesson with her, and drive 2 hours back down to Charlottesville for the audition that day! She was so giving of herself and taught many kids.

I'm not really sure I'll play again. Maybe one day, but sometimes, when I'm at my parent's house, I'll get the gumption to at least open the case and look at it. But right now, it just doesn't feel right to play.

Bonnie
05-17-2009, 09:53 PM
Well, I guess I'm going to be the "oddball" 'cause I can't think of any one "material" thing I prize. Dave said we can't name people. How about "happy memories"? :wink: Right now, especially, in my life, that is what I'm treasuring most.

I do have my "Matt" doll which I got autographed (not the package, but the doll). Btw, I'm a female so I can call my Matt figure a "doll". :laugh:

Jason 16
05-17-2009, 10:41 PM
Id have to say a news paper article about me loseing to the state champ in a summer tourny 6 to 2 when iam a mid leval wrestler and should have been blown out of the water(PA state champ = 2 NJ state champs). umm any thing I earned through hard work trophys, metals, paycheks, belts and so on.

Jim Ed
05-18-2009, 12:11 AM
Mine would be an Alpine Stars cap that belonged to my cousin that was given to me after he passed away

Oddtodd76
05-18-2009, 12:14 AM
another one for me would be the autographed picture of marcus davis. Shane gave it to me yesterday.
It says:
Dear todd,

YOU SUCK!

Marcus Davis

Primadawn
05-18-2009, 12:35 AM
Whenever I am working on a drawing and it is going well, then I become extremely protective over it. If something happens to damage or destroy the picture, it's almost like a death in the family. I can actually slip into a depression for a few days.

Right now I'm working on a drawing of my favorite comic book character, Beast from the X-Men, and I'm so protective of it that I don't even want to show it to anybody yet. So, for right now, it would be my prized possession. If I woke up in the middle of the night with my apartment building on fire, then getting that drawing to safety would be my top priority. I'll most likely even take it with me to Vegas, because I really don't want to be apart from it.

You really have to be an artist to understand, though. I've had drawings ruined in the past and people always say, "Well can't you just draw another one?" It's not that simple. It's almost as insensitive as going up to a parent, attending their child's funeral, and asking them, "Well can't you just have another kid?" It sounds like I'm overstating it, but I'm really not. It's like having a piece of your soul ripped out and you can never get it back. Because no matter how hard you try, you'll never be able to recreate that drawing exactly like it was. It's something that can negatively affect you for days, months, even years.

Of course with every piece of artwork there comes a point where the artist is able to finally release it and if it gets destroyed after that, it would still be a shame, but not nearly as traumatic as if it happened while it was still unfinished.

So, for any parents out there of artistic children, just remember that one of the worst, most traumatic things you could ever do your child would be to rip a piece of artwork out from under them and tear it apart before their eyes. If you disapprove of the subject matter, then let them finish the drawing and get it out of their system. You'll find that they will more than likely be ready to move on of their own accord. If you destroy it in front of them, then that image you are trying to protect them from will be painfully burned into their mind for the rest of their lives.

Wow Nate--thanks for that explanation. My 6 year old is artistic and I would never destroy one of her drawings/paintings in front of her...but every now and then I try to weed out and if she finds something she did in the garbage she FREAKS out! I'll try to be more sensitive from now on...:ashamed:

Mac
05-18-2009, 01:02 AM
I Dont know if i could pick one . , Photo albums full of old family photos , a life in pictures pretty much , Ive got a wall with a bunch of Nice Bucks i worked really hard to get , months spent in freezing temps , hanging off the side of a tree with a bow in my hand year in and year out,. They mean an awful lot to me . A 55 Chevy that i have resurected from the dead , blood sweat and a couple tears in that one and im no where near done , but i love that car. My guns , I dont know what i would do without them , become a democrat ? Seriously tho , a few of those guns have been passed down to me from my dad and they mean an awful lot to me as well . My bow , it provides food for my entire family in the winter months and i truly enjoy sitting in that tree stand , again , dont know what i would do without it. I guess my answer greatly depends on which season of the year it is.

rockdawg21
05-18-2009, 06:48 PM
I was going to say Bible but that's a religious thing so...

I'm torn! I really can't name a definitive #1 so I'll just say:

1. Gym Membership & Exercise bike
2. Xbox 360 & Nintendo Wii
3. Television (how could I play those game systems without it?)
4. Refrigerator

rearnakedchoke
05-18-2009, 07:27 PM
Well, Beast was probably the least objectionable thing about that horrible movie; but I had several problems with how he was depicted:

1. my biggest pet peeve is that he was given blue skin. If you read about his transformation in the comics, his coloration is determined by his fur, not his skin. He originally started out with grey fur (Amazing Adventures #11, 1972), then it was turned to black (Amazing Adventures #15, 1972). However, because of the limited color palette available in those days, the highlights of his fur were colored blue and, over the years, people just assumed that his fur was supposed to be blue from the very beginning.

Underneath all that fur, we're led to believe that Hank has normal colored skin (just extremely pale from lack of exposure to the sun). It's the bluish-black fur that makes him appear the color that he is. Just think of his face like a short-haired dog. The fur is so fine that it doesn't cover up their facial features, but thick enough to completely obscure their skin.

Here's a drawing I did trying to visualize what Beast's face "should" look like close-up with every inch of it covered in a fine fur:
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c201/Barada73/Bouncing_Blue_Beast___color_by_NMRo.jpg

So, giving him blue skin on his face and unnaturally, neon-blue fur really annoyed the crap out of me. I just chalked it up to laziness on the part of the make-up artists.

2. I would have had no problem with Kelsey Grammer voicing an animated version of the character, but the guy is just too average looking to play Beast in a live-action film. We got no sense of Beast having unusually large hands and feet (a key feature of the character). Plus, there was never a hint of any super-strength, super-agility, or extreme athleticism. Beast is supposed to be an acrobat that would put any Olympic gymnast or freak-show contortionist to shame. Kelsey Grammer was just not believable in that role. He looked passable in the promotional shots, but just couldn't pull off the action sequences without obvious wire effects.

3. Finally, Grammer simply played the movie version of the animated Beast from the 1990s cartoon. The reclusive, scientist Beast, who just sits in his lab and never goes out on missions, simply didn't exist in the comics prior to the animated series. In the comic series, Beast was the muscle of the original team and always one of the first heroes leading the charge into battle. In the 1960s, he was depicted as the outspoken, mildly-chauvenistic, grandstander of the X-Men. When he was a member of the Avengers, he was the wisecracking, womanizing, practical-joking, party animal. So the soft-spoken hermit who appeared in the cartoon was a new development for the character; but it seems to be the one that most people are now familiar with.
thanks for the explanation ... i wouldn't have put it that way, but I know what you are talking about ...

Miss Foxy
05-18-2009, 10:17 PM
My most prized possession is my Pippi Longstocking DVD Collection set. Its not the cartoon Pippi its the original!! I have been a fan of these movies since I was 4yrs old. My dad purchased the collection for me a few years ago. I treasure my movies!:wink:

Hughes_GOAT
05-18-2009, 10:36 PM
My most prized possession is my Pippi Longstocking DVD Collection set. Its not the cartoon Pippi its the original!! I have been a fan of these movies since I was 4yrs old. My dad purchased the collection for me a few years ago. I treasure my movies!:wink:
Pippi Longstocking is coming into your world,a freckled faced red haired girl you oughta know....

NateR
05-18-2009, 11:01 PM
Of course, I can't forget about these. The gloves Matt wore during his second fight with Frank Trigg at UFC 52, autographed and everything:
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c201/Barada73/gloves52.jpg

My attachment to drawings comes and goes. After a few years, my skills improve enough that I don't really like my old stuff anymore. These gloves are truly one of a kind and come from what is arguably one of the greatest (if not THE greatest) fights in MMA history.

Jeff Crow
05-19-2009, 12:01 AM
Whenever I am working on a drawing and it is going well, then I become extremely protective over it. If something happens to damage or destroy the picture, it's almost like a death in the family. I can actually slip into a depression for a few days.

Right now I'm working on a drawing of my favorite comic book character, Beast from the X-Men, and I'm so protective of it that I don't even want to show it to anybody yet. So, for right now, it would be my prized possession. If I woke up in the middle of the night with my apartment building on fire, then getting that drawing to safety would be my top priority. I'll most likely even take it with me to Vegas, because I really don't want to be apart from it.

You really have to be an artist to understand, though. I've had drawings ruined in the past and people always say, "Well can't you just draw another one?" It's not that simple. It's almost as insensitive as going up to a parent, attending their child's funeral, and asking them, "Well can't you just have another kid?" It sounds like I'm overstating it, but I'm really not. It's like having a piece of your soul ripped out and you can never get it back. Because no matter how hard you try, you'll never be able to recreate that drawing exactly like it was. It's something that can negatively affect you for days, months, even years.

Of course with every piece of artwork there comes a point where the artist is able to finally release it and if it gets destroyed after that, it would still be a shame, but not nearly as traumatic as if it happened while it was still unfinished.

So, for any parents out there of artistic children, just remember that one of the worst, most traumatic things you could ever do your child would be to rip a piece of artwork out from under them and tear it apart before their eyes. If you disapprove of the subject matter, then let them finish the drawing and get it out of their system. You'll find that they will more than likely be ready to move on of their own accord. If you destroy it in front of them, then that image you are trying to protect them from will be painfully burned into their mind for the rest of their lives.

So thats why you got so nervous when I was sitting close to that drawing moving my feet around it....:laugh: :laugh:

VCURamFan
05-19-2009, 12:02 AM
So thats why you got so nervous when I was sitting close to that drawing moving my feet around it....:laugh: :laugh:Haha, sounds like a scene from a Will Ferrel movie! :laugh:

NateR
05-19-2009, 01:16 AM
So thats why you got so nervous when I was sitting close to that drawing moving my feet around it....:laugh: :laugh:

Yes! Your shoes, which has just been outside like 2 minutes earlier, were hovering directly over the drawing itself! :scared0011: Of course, I was nervous. :laugh:

Anyways, here is the most recent Beast drawing I've been working on. It's finally at a point where I feel I can show it off. I also wanted to get the pencil drawing scanned into the computer because the next step is inking the drawing, which could potentially ruin the entire thing:
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c201/Barada73/beast-newblue.jpg

Hughes_GOAT
05-19-2009, 01:24 AM
Of course, I can't forget about these. The gloves Matt wore during his second fight with Frank Trigg at UFC 52, autographed and everything:
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c201/Barada73/gloves52.jpg


you're lucky Matt's training or he may have noticed you picking art first and not the gloves :laugh:

J.B.
05-19-2009, 02:27 AM
Of course, I can't forget about these. The gloves Matt wore during his second fight with Frank Trigg at UFC 52, autographed and everything:
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c201/Barada73/gloves52.jpg

My attachment to drawings comes and goes. After a few years, my skills improve enough that I don't really like my old stuff anymore. These gloves are truly one of a kind and come from what is arguably one of the greatest (if not THE greatest) fights in MMA history.

Wow, that is totally awesome. If I remember right, I think you posted a picture of these on the old boards a long time ago.

Really, the only thing that could ever come close to topping that (for me) would be if Jordan handed me a game ball after winning the NBA Finals.

NATE = WINNER OF THREAD :laugh:

VCURamFan
05-19-2009, 02:41 AM
The only way to top the UFC 52 gloves is if Matt gives someone his blood-stained gloves from Saturday night.

Pick me, Matt, pick me!!!!

billwilliams70
05-19-2009, 02:54 AM
My 2006 Trek 6500 mountain bike.

Later.

Bonnie
05-19-2009, 03:29 AM
Yes! Your shoes, which has just been outside like 2 minutes earlier, were hovering directly over the drawing itself! :scared0011: Of course, I was nervous. :laugh:

Anyways, here is the most recent Beast drawing I've been working on. It's finally at a point where I feel I can show it off. I also wanted to get the pencil drawing scanned into the computer because the next step is inking the drawing, which could potentially ruin the entire thing:
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c201/Barada73/beast-newblue.jpg

Nathan, this drawing is all done by hand (no computer stuff)? The body detail is so realistic. It's really great! :cool:

VCURamFan
05-19-2009, 03:36 AM
Nathan, this drawing is all done by hand (no computer stuff)? The body detail is so realistic. It's really great! :cool:Aside from the large hands & feet, does anyone else think Hank bears a striking resemblance to Matt? :laugh:

NateR
05-19-2009, 03:42 AM
Nathan, this drawing is all done by hand (no computer stuff)? The body detail is so realistic. It's really great! :cool:

It's all drawn in pencil. I just used Photoshop to bring up the contrast and drop the background out.

Bonnie
05-19-2009, 03:49 AM
Aside from the large hands & feet, does anyone else think Hank bears a striking resemblance to Matt? :laugh:

Well, actually, I think his eyes remind me of Matt but the rest of his face, to me, looks like Nate. :)

NateR
05-19-2009, 04:02 AM
Aside from the large hands & feet, does anyone else think Hank bears a striking resemblance to Matt? :laugh:

Well, I used a photo of Matt as reference for the body and the eyes. The rest of the face was drawn using the comic books as reference. I studied a bunch of photos of short hair dogs to get the fur right. The glasses are based on my glasses. The coffee mug is drawn from a mug out of my cupboard and the book is based on one of my study Bibles.

VCURamFan
05-19-2009, 04:10 AM
Well, I used a photo of Matt as reference for the body and the eyes. The rest of the face was drawn using the comic books as reference. I studied a bunch of photos of short hair dogs to get the fur right. The glasses are based on my glasses. The coffee mug is drawn from a mug out of my cupboard and the book is based on one of my study Bibles.That's awesome. This kind of info is the reason I love watching the behind-the-scenes stuff on DVDs. After viewing a work of art (I consider cinema an art form, unfortunately, it's usually done extremely poorly), to hear about all the thought and care that went into its production just makes me appreciate it even more.

Bonnie
05-19-2009, 04:11 AM
The body does remind me of Matt, but the glasses, hairline and nose remind me of you, Nathan. I'm going to have to look up Hank McCoy to see what he looks like in the comics.

Y'all do realize that when Nathan becomes famous, we're going to be able to say we knew him when....

Nathan, are you blushing? :laugh:

VCURamFan
05-19-2009, 04:14 AM
The body does remind me of Matt, but the glasses, hairline and nose remind me of you, Nathan. I'm going to have to look up Hank McCoy to see what he looks like in the comics.

Y'all do realize that when Nathan becomes famous, we're going to be able to say we knew him when....

Nathan, are you blushing? :laugh:I can see it now that you point that out.

Primadawn
05-19-2009, 04:29 AM
I immediately thought it looked like Nate too.


Now, as resident perv..I have to ask...can you ask him to move his arm?:laugh:

Bonnie
05-19-2009, 04:38 AM
I immediately thought it looked like Nate too.


Now, as resident perv..I have to ask...can you ask him to move his arm?:laugh:

Now, you've done it! I wasn't going to say anything, but Ben did point out his big feet and big hands...:Whistle:


:laugh:

Buzzard
05-19-2009, 04:48 AM
My German-made Deutch 1997 violin. I remember that day like yesterday, when my violin teacher, Carol Taylor, my mom, and me went up to Potter's in Bethesda Maryland in 8th grade. With some will money, my mom wanted me to pick out an instrument that I could have for life. Carol helped me, and played it first, and it was love at first sight. I started taking lessons right after I turned 9 (I'm almost 26 now)

That violin has seen weddigs, funerals, joys, sadness, loss, and triumph. I played it in rain, sleet, snow, and sunny days, no joke. I've even played it on street corners in DC, Alexandria, a beach, the Kennedy Center in DC, Charlottesville, and in civil war re-enactments and period plays.

I've also taught kids on it and my viola, and that violin helped me become a nationally ranked player in high school. :cool: I went to regionals, states, and to Disney world to play. Violin was a way of life. The violin resume is about 5 pages compared to my 1 page job resume!

I stopped playing the violin in January of 2008, after the death of my violin teacher due to pancreatic cancer (the same kind Patrick Swayze has).

Like Nate and Lil D have said, its not easy to just pick up and go again. Carol taught me everything I know about the violin, bluegrass, jazz and fiddle. She was always there if I had a last minute audition, and i would drive 2 hrs to Northern VA, take a quick lesson with her, and drive 2 hours back down to Charlottesville for the audition that day! She was so giving of herself and taught many kids.

I'm not really sure I'll play again. Maybe one day, but sometimes, when I'm at my parent's house, I'll get the gumption to at least open the case and look at it. But right now, it just doesn't feel right to play.


Keep playing, don't let your talent go to waste.

VCURamFan
05-19-2009, 04:49 AM
I immediately thought it looked like Nate too.


Now, as resident perv..I have to ask...can you ask him to move his arm?:laugh:If you look closely, as I'm sure you already are, you'll be able to notice the hem of some short on his left leg. Sorry! :laugh:

Primadawn
05-19-2009, 05:13 AM
Now, you've done it! I wasn't going to say anything, but Ben did point out his big feet and big hands...:Whistle:


:laugh:

All that usually means is big gloves and big shoes Bonnie...or so I've heard...:ninja:

Bonnie
05-19-2009, 05:18 AM
All that usually means is big gloves and big shoes Bonnie...or so I've heard...:ninja:


Whatever you say, Pinocchio... :laugh:

Llamafighter
05-21-2009, 04:32 PM
Wow Nate, I must have missed all of this when my computer was down. That si a great design for Beaste. Natural posture for the character and the hair type you've chosen is perfect. I look forward to seeing the finished copy. The mug is a perfect choice in size for Hank.

The gloves are pretty badass too! I'm sure one day there'll be a UFC museum and someone will offer you a bundle for em. Which I'm certain you'll refuse:)

County Mike
05-21-2009, 06:30 PM
I passed over this thread many times and just now read it all. I thought Beast looked like Matt as well.

I don't know if I really have a most prized posession. I could say the two items I use the most and would miss if I didn't have them would be my cell phone and laptop. Kinda sad I guess, but I'm really not attached to THINGS. More attached to what I can use them for. Even if I lost my laptop, I could get by for a little while with my cell phone. It has internet browsing - just slower and harder to type.

rearnakedchoke
05-21-2009, 07:19 PM
my cigar cutter