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Neezar
02-13-2013, 04:12 AM
Key events in manhunt for fugitive ex-LA officer

Key events in the expansive, ongoing manhunt for Christopher Dorner, the fired Los Angeles police officer suspected of killing three people including a police officer in Southern California and posting a manifesto on Facebook outlining plans to kill the families of those he says have wronged him, all times approximate:

Sunday, Feb. 3: An assistant women's college basketball coach and her fiance are found shot to death in their car in Irvine, Calif. Police learn later the woman was the daughter of a retired Los Angeles police captain who represented Dorner in disciplinary hearings that resulted in his dismissal from the force.

Monday, Feb. 4: Some of Dorner's belongings, including police equipment, are found in a trash bin in suburban San Diego, linking him to Irvine killings.

Wednesday, Feb. 6: Police announce finding Dorner's manifesto online.

10:30 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 6: A man matching Dorner's description makes a failed attempt to steal a boat from a San Diego marina. An 81-year-old man on the vessel is tied up but otherwise unharmed.

1:30 a.m., Thursday, Feb. 7: LAPD officers, protecting a person named in the manifesto, chase a vehicle they believe is Dorner's. One officer is grazed in the forehead by a bullet during a shootout, and the gunman flees.

A short time later, a shooter believed to be Dorner ambushes two Riverside police officers during a routine patrol. One officer is killed, and the other critically injured.

2:20 a.m., Thursday, Feb. 7: A shuttle bus driver turns in a wallet with an LAPD badge and a picture ID of Dorner to San Diego police. The wallet was found fewer than five miles from the boat, near San Diego International Airport.

5 a.m., Thursday, Feb. 7: LAPD officers guarding a manifesto target in the Los Angeles suburb of Torrance open fire on a truck they mistakenly believe to be Dorner's. A mother and daughter delivering the newspaper are injured.

A short time later, Torrance police are involved in a second shooting involving a different truck they also mistake for Dorner's. Nobody is hurt.

8:35 a.m., Thursday, Feb. 7: Police find a burned-out pickup truck near the Big Bear ski area in the San Bernardino Mountains. Six hours later, authorities identify it as Dorner's.

9:40 a.m., Thursday, Feb. 7: Naval Base Point Loma in San Diego is locked down after a Navy worker reports seeing someone who resembles Dorner. Military officials later said Dorner had indeed checked into a hotel on base earlier in the week on Tuesday but had left on Wednesday.

4 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 7: Authorities search a Las Vegas-area home belonging to Dorner and leave with several boxes of items. They say no weapons were found but decline to disclose what was discovered.

Friday, Feb. 8: Dozens of searchers hunt for Dorner in the freezing, snowy San Bernardino Mountains after losing his footprints near the site where the truck was found. Authorities search Dorner's mother's house in La Palma and collect 10 bags of evidence and also take five electronic items for examination. Police also search a storage locker in Buena Park.

Saturday, Feb. 9: Helicopters equipped with heat-seeking technology resume search for Dorner in the mountains near Big Bear. Authorities reveal that weapons and camping gear were found in Dorner's burned truck.

Sunday, Feb. 10: Authorities announce $1 million reward for information leading to Dorner's arrest.

Monday, Feb. 11: Riverside County prosecutors charge Dorner with murdering a police officer and the attempted murder of three other officers in a potential death penalty case. Authorities receive more than 700 tips since the reward was announced.

12:20 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12: Police are summoned after a man resembling Dorner steals a vehicle in the San Bernardino Mountains. The vehicle is quickly located on Highway 38. The suspect abandons the vehicle, runs into the forest and barricades himself inside a cabin.

12:40 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12: State Fish and Wildlife wardens are involved in a shootout with the suspect. Two San Bernardino County sheriff's deputies are wounded in a second exchange of gunfire.

4:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12: Police surround the cabin where the suspect is holed up and gunfire erupts before a blaze engulfs the structure and law enforcement officers wait for the fire to burn out.

4:50 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12: A San Bernardino County sheriff's spokeswoman confirms one of the two wounded deputies has died, and the other is in surgery and expected to survive.

6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12: Police find a charred body in the rubble of the burned cabin. They don't confirm the identity, although authorities earlier said they believed the man in the cabin was Dorner.

Neezar
02-15-2013, 01:52 AM
So no one is suprised that LAPD shot a woman and her son delivering the morning newspaper? :unsure-1:


Well, okay. Me neither. Not really. :mellow:



:laugh:

MattHughesRocks
02-15-2013, 05:40 AM
I spent almost 2 weeks in So Cal as this was going on. People that resembled Dorner were wearing t-shirts that said " DON'T SHOOT.I'M NOT DORNER!!!" and people with trucks resembling his ( how ever slightly) were putting cardboard signs in their windows that said "THIS IS NOT DORNER'S TRUCK! PLEASE DON'T SHOOT!"

The woman that got shot (in the BACK) was a 71 year old little Mexican lady that was delivering newspapers with her 40 something year old daughter who was grazed by a bullet. They just opened fire as they were in someone's driveway to drop off the paper.There was another man that was grazed when they shot up his truck as well. It wasn't even the same make as Doner's.

I'll tell you, those cops are NO different that Crazy Doner and they need to go to PRISON for what they did to those poor people.

Anyway, glad it's over!

flo
02-15-2013, 05:51 AM
What the LAPD did was irresponsible, they need to be held accountable and those poor people awarded damages. But surely you must agree that they aren't quite the same as the insane serial killer.

NateR
02-15-2013, 06:09 AM
I can understand that being a police officer is an extremely stressful job, but it can't be more stressful than being a soldier. If a US Infantryman had accidentally shot two unarmed civilians, then he would be sitting in a military prison awaiting his court martial. So it's inconceivable to me that the police officers who shot the innocent bystanders aren't being prosecuted right now. :huh:

MattHughesRocks
02-15-2013, 06:34 AM
Those that shot blindly at those people are EXACTLY the same as Dorner. There is no way you can say they are 1 ounce different or better. Criminals.



What the LAPD did was irresponsible, they need to be held accountable and those poor people awarded damages. But surely you must agree that they aren't quite the same as the insane serial killer.

flo
02-15-2013, 07:41 AM
Those that shot blindly at those people are EXACTLY the same as Dorner. There is no way you can say they are 1 ounce different or better. Criminals.

Yeah, I can say they are different and I am saying it. There are lots of differences but we can start with the obvious, the LAPD shooting wasn't premeditated.

I agree it was wrong, they overreacted and I'm sure they will be prosecuted criminally as well as civilly.

MattHughesRocks
02-15-2013, 02:53 PM
That is premeditation if I ever saw it. Those guys were out to shoot and kill Dorner even if it meant blindly shooting others and they shot at anything that resembled him or his truck and they kept doing it right down to when they torched that cabin having no idea if there was anyone other then Dorner in it.
How is that not premeditation?


Yeah, I can say they are different and I am saying it. There are lots of differences but we can start with the obvious, the LAPD shooting wasn't premeditated.

I agree it was wrong, they overreacted and I'm sure they will be prosecuted criminally as well as civilly.

flo
02-15-2013, 07:59 PM
If you can't tell the difference, nothing I say will change your mind.

Dorner murdered 4 people. The LAPD killed...how many?

Tyburn
02-15-2013, 08:26 PM
Frankly...I expect better from the American Law Enforcement.

This type of accident happens occasionally in England with the squad of Police who ARE armed. They just dont seem capable....but one has to remember that havent grown up in an environment where handguns...or probably the training of using them...is prevelent. Therefore, mistakes might happen more often.

But for those sort of mistakes to happen in a culture where all police have firearms is absolutely unacceptable.

Why can they not get their inteligence verified before they start shooting? The Americans cant get the right van...The British follow the wrong man from a tower block of supposed terrorists despite having an accurate description.

But to manage to shoot two MEXICAN WOMEN when they are looking for a BLACK MALE...I mean HOW do you make that mistake???? :huh:

The Americans didnt actually manage to kill by accident...but who knows if that, too, was down to being generally incompetant? If they cant tell the difference between a Mexican Woman and a Black Man...then what are the chances they are going to be much of a good shot anyway :unsure-1:

Unfortunately...the British parallel wasnt so happy. It became obvious to the inocent man that he was being followed, so he went down into the Tubes to get away, and a member of the squad who was NOT in uniform pulled a gun out and wondered why the guy ran.

They followed him onto the tube where he slipt and fell, and they shot him seven times point blank range in the head infront of the entire passenger carriage.

Then they lied, when they realized that he wasnt the right man...and they claimed that he had jumped the ticket barriers to escape, which CCTV at the station doesnt uphold. They also claimed he was wearing a huge duffle jacket in the middle of summer which they thought was hiding the bombs...unfortunately, a picture of the corpse minus the head, published in the press showed he was wearing a tight denim jacket that he couldnt have hidden anything underneith

The final defence was he ran when confronted with a gun...No shyte. He didnt run because he was guilty, he ran because an unidentified man who had been stalking him for no reason pulled a gun on him...The victim didnt even know the guy was a police officer...and in a culture where you simply never see guns period...if you see one...its probably the last thing you'll ever see....for him...it pretty much was.

They had a public enquiry...but no criminal prosecution, I dont know about civil recovery....but as the guy was Brazilian and not British...:sad:

flo
02-15-2013, 08:34 PM
Frankly...I expect better from the American Law Enforcement.



So does everyone, Tyburn. I think all Americans were stunned and dismayed by the police reaction. We saw the images of that truck shot up and the first thing I thought was that no one could have survived such a barrage. It was totally unprofessional, an overreaction, and there have to be serious legal consequences for their actions.

I just don't consider the LAPD responsible to be "no different" from Dorner.

Tyburn
02-15-2013, 08:36 PM
"The decision by the Crown Prosecution Service today marks another low point in appalling way the British legal system has dealt with the killing of Jean Charles de Menezes. Last year, the jury at the inquest found that Jean was not lawfully killed; rejected the police's versions of events and found that the police lied. How can the public have faith in the police service if they know officers can literally get away with murder? The Menezes family, their lawyers and supporters now call on parliamentarians to act on repairing the failing legislative framework around deaths in custody and police accountability and we will be stepping up their campaign in this area.

Almost exactly 10 years from the publication of the Stephen Lawrence inquiry today's decision makes it clear that there has been no progress in achieving any sense of a decent system of police accountability in the UK and while the shoot to kill policy remains in place, another family could go through the same horrendous ordeal as the Menezes family "

Tyburn
02-15-2013, 08:54 PM
So does everyone, Tyburn. I think all Americans were stunned and dismayed by the police reaction. We saw the images of that truck shot up and the first thing I thought was that no one could have survived such a barrage. It was totally unprofessional, an overreaction, and there have to be serious legal consequences for their actions.

I just don't consider the LAPD responsible to be "no different" from Dorner.

They are more alike then ever if you consider WHY the mass murderer claimed he was actually committing crimes in the first place.

He wasnt a terrorist was he Flo....he was a disgruntled Employee...We must now consider, if they cant act professionally, and are prone to over-reaction...perhaps he was wrongly sacked....and the fact that, from the Killers point of view, they HAVENT faced "Serious legal consequences for their actions" might be what pushed him over the edge.

Not an excuse...but you have to admit...this wasnt a regular criminal. They were chasing a Rogue Agent....and they have been found to be wanting in that campaign...in light of the accusations...thats conflict of interest for the force if ever there was one.

You expect a law enforcement establishment to be just, because its whole job is about the administration of Justice...but I've found, from my own experience, of working with an Establishment, that by its nature had to be whiter then white...that they are the absolute worst.

IMHO...Looking at this evidence...whilst I dont condone what the Killer did...I think the actions of the police force indicate a huge liklihood that whatever alligations the former officer had about constructive dismissal...which is what "wrongly fired" amounts to in England (though not under US Employment Law) are probably true.

Are their attempts to Silence him any more justified then his attempts to gain vengance? You cant be seriously telling me, that you think these police officers will be in trouble...no...Flo...they were just doing their job, they were trying to save innocent lives by taking out a criminal who was threatening mass murder.

They are Heroes.

The badges they wear will be their protection.

Is it the Armed Government Forces you need to fear...or are you already at gunpoint by local law enforcement agencies...Perhaps their protection, is proof of a form of Tyrany?

If you cant trust the Police...who can you trust?

MattHughesRocks
02-15-2013, 09:50 PM
OH MY GOD. You are so retarded. Seriously. Cops didn't kill because they missed. Cops don't shoot to scare you they are trained to shoot to kill. I KNOW this.

If you can't tell the difference, nothing I say will change your mind.

Dorner murdered 4 people. The LAPD killed...how many?

flo
02-16-2013, 05:14 AM
I can't take you seriously. You can't discuss an issue; if anyone disagrees with you, you resort to the lowest common denominator - name calling.

Classy.

NateR
02-16-2013, 05:39 AM
Cops shooting at the wrong vehicle and killing the occupants would be manslaughter at worst; but the definitions of murder vary from state to state. If the occupants are just injured then it's even less severe of a crime.

Technically, manslaughter is not the same as premeditated, or first-degree, murder.

However, I think those police officers need to be taken off of active duty and placed under arrest until they can stand trial. Reckless cops have no business on the police force.

MattHughesRocks
02-16-2013, 05:42 AM
:laugh:

I can't take you seriously. You can't discuss an issue; if anyone disagrees with you, you resort to the lowest common denominator - name calling.

Classy.

MattHughesRocks
02-16-2013, 05:49 AM
I get it but I'm not talking about the actual name of the crime, but the fact that those cops shot blindly into trucks that they had no idea who was in it need to go to prison just like Dorner would have had he lived. Or something like that I'm tired :unsure-1:
And speaking of, since day 1 I said he would off him self before he let the cops shoot and sure enough, he put one in his own head. I feel like I won a bet :laugh:




Cops shooting at the wrong vehicle and killing the occupants would be manslaughter at worst; but the definitions of murder vary from state to state. If the occupants are just injured then it's even less severe of a crime.

Technically, manslaughter is not the same as premeditated, or first-degree, murder.

However, I think those police officers need to be taken off of active duty and placed under arrest until they can stand trial. Reckless cops have no business on the police force.

Bonnie
02-16-2013, 06:32 AM
OH MY GOD. You are so retarded. Seriously. Cops didn't kill because they missed. Cops don't shoot to scare you they are trained to shoot to kill. I KNOW this.

Well, we can be thankful they didn't end up killing those people. I agree that something needs to be done about the police officers involved in those incidents, but I don't agree that they are the same as Dorner. He set out to kill; I don't think they necessarily set out to kill him at the beginning, but I think Dorner made it a probable outcome if he didn't kill himself first. When you say they are EXACTLY like Dorner, how do you mean, exactly?

He was a former cop, one of them before he was fired, he was trained in weapons, he knew how they thought, worked, and reacted to situations so all that gave him an advantage. He set out to kill cops and their families, and he said he wasn't going to be taken alive. It's understandable every law enforcement officer out there would be on edge especially after he started killing, doing exactly what he said he was going to do! It doesn't excuse recklessness on the police's part, but I think we can all appreciate the tremendous pressure and stress they were under trying to find this guy. As long as they didn't know where he was, each of them was wearing a target on their back (not mention their families!). Dorner put a target on his own back, they didn't. His motive was revenge, and he wasn't going to stop until he was dead.

Police aren't perfect and they should be held accountable for their actions, but Dorner is the killer here, he's the one who set all this in motion.

Neezar
02-16-2013, 01:53 PM
Finally! My thread gets some action! :frantics:







Not the kind I was looking for but, hey, beggars can't be choosers. :laugh:

Tyburn
02-16-2013, 04:38 PM
Well, we can be thankful they didn't end up killing those people. I agree that something needs to be done about the police officers involved in those incidents, but I don't agree that they are the same as Dorner. He set out to kill; I don't think they necessarily set out to kill him at the beginning, but I think Dorner made it a probable outcome if he didn't kill himself first. When you say they are EXACTLY like Dorner, how do you mean, exactly?

He was a former cop, one of them before he was fired, he was trained in weapons, he knew how they thought, worked, and reacted to situations so all that gave him an advantage. He set out to kill cops and their families, and he said he wasn't going to be taken alive. It's understandable every law enforcement officer out there would be on edge especially after he started killing, doing exactly what he said he was going to do! It doesn't excuse recklessness on the police's part, but I think we can all appreciate the tremendous pressure and stress they were under trying to find this guy. As long as they didn't know where he was, each of them was wearing a target on their back (not mention their families!). Dorner put a target on his own back, they didn't. His motive was revenge, and he wasn't going to stop until he was dead.

Police aren't perfect and they should be held accountable for their actions, but Dorner is the killer here, he's the one who set all this in motion.

Careful there...because that depends on what you think the trigger was. IF the Trigger was to be wrongly sacked, and if that was ever shown to be a good cause of that being the case, technically speaking, those who fired him set all this in motion.

I dont advocate getting revenge...but I DO understand how it feels to be squashed by a large institution which presents a squeaky clean image, and then plays really dirty politics. I DO understand that where successful that can distroy the life and livelihoods of the people who are hard done by...and these people who engage in that, they never are bought to justice in civil cases.

There should be some accountability within the workplace...now in England there is some accountability by law...but that law doesnt exist in the United States...again, Unions can be abused, they can start sponcering Governmental parties, they can start to cause problems if they dont get their way, when its injust that their demands are met through their sheer size...but they also serve a long forgotten function...to stop some capitalist sacking you simply because he doesnt like you...or framing you with excuses because he doesnt like you in order to get you into trouble...or...telling lies about you. You are NOT protected against that by Law in the US...there is NO proper way to get justice if that happens to you...there isnt proper justice in the UK either...but there are safeguards in law which act as reasonable deterents.

Good men can go bad if pushed to far. they can psychologically snap, or act irratically because they are hurting, or angry, not just at whats happened to them...but what DOESNT happen to those who acted against them.

As far as the mass murderer is concerned....He DID NOT start this....He got to the stage where he felt this was the only way to draw attention to the injustice.

Many families in England are suffering a lot, many businesses also, because of a few wealthy American Businessmen who bent the rules in the financial sector. Noone has been bought to justic over that...being removed from your post with a pay off, doesnt count :laugh:

Tyburn
02-16-2013, 04:41 PM
Finally! My thread gets some action! :frantics:







Not the kind I was looking for but, hey, beggars can't be choosers. :laugh:

I'f I'd known it was your thread...I'd have posted even more :laugh:

Bonnie
02-16-2013, 08:08 PM
Finally! My thread gets some action! :frantics:

Not the kind I was looking for but, hey, beggars can't be choosers. :laugh:

:laugh:

Careful there...because that depends on what you think the trigger was. IF the Trigger was to be wrongly sacked, and if that was ever shown to be a good cause of that being the case, technically speaking, those who fired him set all this in motion.

I dont advocate getting revenge...but I DO understand how it feels to be squashed by a large institution which presents a squeaky clean image, and then plays really dirty politics. I DO understand that where successful that can distroy the life and livelihoods of the people who are hard done by...and these people who engage in that, they never are bought to justice in civil cases.

There should be some accountability within the workplace...now in England there is some accountability by law...but that law doesnt exist in the United States...again, Unions can be abused, they can start sponcering Governmental parties, they can start to cause problems if they dont get their way, when its injust that their demands are met through their sheer size...but they also serve a long forgotten function...to stop some capitalist sacking you simply because he doesnt like you...or framing you with excuses because he doesnt like you in order to get you into trouble...or...telling lies about you. You are NOT protected against that by Law in the US...there is NO proper way to get justice if that happens to you...there isnt proper justice in the UK either...but there are safeguards in law which act as reasonable deterents.

Good men can go bad if pushed to far. they can psychologically snap, or act irratically because they are hurting, or angry, not just at whats happened to them...but what DOESNT happen to those who acted against them.

As far as the mass murderer is concerned....He DID NOT start this....He got to the stage where he felt this was the only way to draw attention to the injustice.



You say you don't advocate revenge, but it seems like you are justifying his actions and saying he is not responsible for them. Even before this was over people were justifying his actions, and now they want to paint him as a hero. We don't know that he got a raw deal when he was fired, they've re-opened his case from back then. Even if that were the case, it doesn't justify his actions. Lots of people get raw deals in life, it doesn't give you license to go out and kill and exact vengeance. Even if it is proven that he was treated fairly during that whole process when he was fired, some people will still choose not to believe it and they'll make him into a martyr. If he really wanted to be a martyr for injustice, he should have given himself up and gone to prison, then Hollywood would have made a documentary about him and he could have been the new celeb cause with the usual celebrities pleading for his release and telling the world what a raw deal he got. :rolleyes:

flo
02-16-2013, 08:59 PM
Finally! My thread gets some action! :frantics:







Not the kind I was looking for but, hey, beggars can't be choosers. :laugh:

LMAO!!! :laugh::laugh::laugh:

County Mike
02-19-2013, 01:03 PM
Finally! My thread gets some action! :frantics:







Not the kind I was looking for but, hey, beggars can't be choosers. :laugh:

Hey baby! If you're looking for action, just give me a call.
http://cdn.chud.com/9/92/9299e207_the-man-with-two-brains-w1280.jpeg

VCURamFan
02-19-2013, 06:00 PM
Hey baby! If you're looking for action, just give me a call.
http://cdn.chud.com/9/92/9299e207_the-man-with-two-brains-w1280.jpeg

We are TWO WILD & CRAZY GUYS!!!
http://thewhimsiad.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/snl-the-best-of-dan-ackroyd-20051019003351836.jpg

County Mike
02-19-2013, 06:28 PM
Haha

Tyburn
02-19-2013, 07:42 PM
:laugh:



You say you don't advocate revenge, but it seems like you are justifying his actions and saying he is not responsible for them. Even before this was over people were justifying his actions, and now they want to paint him as a hero. We don't know that he got a raw deal when he was fired, they've re-opened his case from back then. Even if that were the case, it doesn't justify his actions. Lots of people get raw deals in life, it doesn't give you license to go out and kill and exact vengeance. Even if it is proven that he was treated fairly during that whole process when he was fired, some people will still choose not to believe it and they'll make him into a martyr. If he really wanted to be a martyr for injustice, he should have given himself up and gone to prison, then Hollywood would have made a documentary about him and he could have been the new celeb cause with the usual celebrities pleading for his release and telling the world what a raw deal he got. :rolleyes:

I'm NOT justifying Revenge...but I can see FROM HIS POINT OF VIEW.

He would most definately have blamed his actions on having been fired from the police force. The reason I brought it up was the fact that this is the same force thats shown its incompetance during the manhunt...you have to ask...if they are incompetant in one area, and thus untrustworthy in that area...can you believe anything they say.

As for Giving himself up. I have a suspicion that once it began, he had no intention of living beyond its conclusion. It is a form of suicide, he quite deliberately went past the point of no return, because I imagine he felt he had lost everything and there was no point in continuing with life...all that was left was to spread awareness and get as much vengence as possible before the inevitable...either being killed by a police office during the chase, or killing himself when the chase was concluded.

I do happen to believe that once you are in that sort of state, you are NOT in a normal frame of mind. I personally still believe that you should be accountable for your actions because this is NOT clinical Maddness we are talking about...but its a VERY different state of awareness...Most people stay in a single state their whole lives...some go mad...but the clue to being mad is, YOU DONT KNOW IT....now, he had full awareness of what he was doing, even if the State of Mind he was in had transformed him beyond all recognition of who he was as a person before. Fear and Anxiety and depression can change someones State of Mind for a long period of time. Suicidal tendancies and self harm are a short term change in the state of mind, There is clinical maddness of course...the other things that can do it are some types of drugs, these are usually short term. Deep states of meditation, and some natural physiological stimuli, like that of an athlete in an almost trance like state can do it...but those are for short times.

I know about this, because I have experience of having lived for about 9 months in a completely different state of mind. I am on permanent medication to stop this ever occuring again and have been for almost an entire decade.

Its a crazy thing to try and explain to someone who hasnt experienced it...but its a completely different way of thinking, acting, and being...its like a different you both personality wise and mannerisms. So you see that whilst I dont condone his actions, I actually do understand him, and the psychological processes that led to what he did. I dont agree with his argument because I believe in self discipline and accountability...BUT I can understand for a person who didnt have that exactly what would be the case.